The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association

Reproductive Health

Reproductive Health

In many parts of the world, women lack control of their reproductive rights. This can be a result of economic barriers, the absence of education about family planning methods, religious and cultural restrictions, and limits on access to various forms of birth control. When women do not have control of their reproductive health, it can extend into other parts of their lives as well; many young girls continue to be victims of child marriage and female genital mutilation, pregnancies can be very dangerous due to inadequate prenatal care, and death as a result of pregnancy complications is a real risk that many women face. Additionally, when women do not have control over their reproductive health, they face an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS. Today, women constitute more than half of all people worldwide living with HIV. AIDS-related illnesses remain the leading cause of death for women of reproductive age (15-44). Young women (10-24 years), and adolescent girls (10-19 years) in particular, account for a disproportionate number of new HIV infections. In fact, young women are twice as likely to acquire HIV as their male counterparts. Consequently, these women are also at an increased risk of transmitting the disease to their children, especially when those pregnancies are unplanned and/or when the mother does not have access to appropriate medical care throughout her pregnancy.

 

There are steps being made towards addressing the conditions that result in these increased dangers. A medical study out of Mumbai, India found that improved access to family planning education and birth control methods helped reduce the number of unplanned pregnancies, and by extension, the number of children being born with HIV infections contracted from their mothers. Additionally, studies in Kenya and Swaziland in 2008 and 2013 found that when women had access to both prenatal and HIV/AIDS treatment at the same health care facilities, they were more likely to seek the treatments. Laws establishing a minimum age for marriage help to combat the practice of child marriage, which strips young girls of the ability to control their own future. Furthermore, laws against domestic violence and sexual assault are fostering a safer environment for women and girls, which in turn reduces their risk of contracting an STD.

 

Steps must continue to be taken to improve reproductive health and autonomy for all women. As long as women are deprived of control over their own reproductive health, they will remain in increased danger for complicated pregnancies, contracting sexually transmitted diseases, and other health risks. The international community must strive to build on the success of previous measures, because increases in female and maternal health drive corresponding increases in community and family health. Potential options include expansion of sex education programs for women, in order to ensure they’re more informed about the risks of pregnancy and unprotected sex, and the broader provision of birth control and contraceptive devices. The committee should also consider societal attitudes toward and the availability of male contraceptives. Wider understanding of the benefits and proper usage of male contraceptives could reduce unwanted pregnancies and give women greater reproductive control. The road will not be easy – gender roles often have a variety of social, cultural, and religious roots, and are deeply entrenched. As such, opposition to change may be difficult to navigate.

  • EDerrer
    EDerrer November 13, 2017 Reply

    Lebanon- Model UN Women
    Reproductive Health
    Steps must continue to be taken to improve reproductive health and autonomy for all women. If women are deprived of control over their own reproductive health, they will remain in increased danger for complicated pregnancies, contracting sexually transmitted diseases, and other health risks. Lebanon recognizes and understands the need for further understanding and research into reproductive health. With work through the UNFPA Lebanon has greater spread understanding of the importance of reproductive health and has set goals to reach to further reach members of the population. These goals “will strengthen access to, and utilization of, high-quality services in underserved areas, addressing: (a) maternal mortality and morbidity; (b) unmet family planning needs; (c) sexually transmitted infections; and (d) mental health.” (Women’s Perceptions of Reproductive Health in Three Communities around Beirut, Lebanon)
    On paper, the programs that have been set make sense, but how are they working culturally? “The women’s understanding of [safe and modern] reproductive health included three major themes, which were expressed differently in the three communities. [The women’s] understanding included good physical and mental health, and underscored the need for activities promoting health. Their ability to reproduce and raise children, practice family planning and birth spacing, and go through pregnancy and motherhood safely were central to their reproductive duties and their social status. Finally, they saw reproductive health within the context of economic status, good marital relations and strength to cope with their lives.” (A 2005 Reproductive Health Matters). Some people in Lebanon has been reached, but not all, so what else is there to do?
    There are more things that to be done in Lebanon, financial and cultural maters still need to be faced with regards to reproductive health. Financial matters are a problem in underdeveloped parts of Lebanon. Should those who are receiving the education on reproductive health pay? Should the nation-state pay? Should there be a set program be paid for and distributed nationally? Should this program be international? Culturally reproductive health is known about, but needs more acknowledgement to be the most affective. How can countries spread ideas about reproductive health? Is this a community’s job or the countries? The UN needs to consider each of these issues when proposing a solution for reproductive health.

  • avatar image
    lily martin November 14, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Rights
    Country: Saudi Arabia

    As the world becomes more globalized there as been many movements in favor of women’s rights, especially in relation to women’s right. Saudi Arabia, as follower of Sharia law, is admittedly against liberal views on reproductive rights. Women’s bodies are bearers and reproducers of culture and tradition. Saudi Arabia views abortion as a last resort only if the woman’s life is at risk and the pregnancy is less than four months old. Saudi Arabia values all life, no matter how old. If the baby is older than four months, a panel of approved specialists are required  to declare that the pregnancy will result in the death of the woman. Saudi Arabia is strongly pro-family and we believe every child is a gift from God. We fully support women having kids within marriage. Every child is a valued life and will contribute to our growing nation of Saudi Arabia. We are against sex outside of marriage, thus with proper planning between husband and wife, abortion and birth control can be avoid. Reproductive rights of a woman is not just up to the woman. A baby is just as much the fathers and the mothers. Furthermore, men should have a large say in women’s reproductive rights and decisions. Saudi Arabia believes each country should have their own set of laws regarding reproductive rights. Not one country is the same. Thus, when it comes to reproductive rights there is no one size rights all.

  • Adrienneparkss
    Adrienneparkss November 14, 2017 Reply

    November 11, 2017
    SUBMITTED TO: UN Women
    FROM: The Republic of Cuba
    SUBJECT: Reproductive Health

    The delegation of Cuba believes that reproductive health needs to be a priority for all nations because reproductive health is important for the general health of individuals and therefore is a prerequisite for social, and economic well being. Cuba firmly believes that the most effective means for improving reproductive health is through education and prevention methods. Education is important when it comes to reproductive health because it leads to awareness about sexually transmitted infections, and what can happen when you do not use preventative measures like contraceptives. We have found that our emphasis on contraceptives, along with the education that has been implemented in Cuba, has helped the rates Of HIV and AIDS decrease.

    With this in mind, the Cuban delegation believes that there are many different aspects of this issue that need to be addressed, and there are many different questions that need to be answered by this committee. specifically, How can we promote better health care for all? In what ways can we work toward improving access and resources for family planning education? And finally, how can we make sure all countries have the resources needed to better their reproductive healthcare outlook and availability?

    In order for this to be a comprehensive resolution, Cuba believes that all nations need to understand that reproductive health is about the individual’s right to choose. We believe that an individual has the right to be able to avoid unwanted pregnancies, they have the right to contraceptives, and they should have the right to an education on prevention and their health. As a committee we need to find ways to promote reproductive rights for women, so that if they do contract an STI or become pregnant, they have options and are educated on what those options are. If these things are not addressed in a resolution, then the delegation of Cuba believes that the resolution will not be comprehensive enough.

    This committee is giving us the opportunity to make a difference for women when it comes to their reproductive health. We believe that if all nations in attendance work together, we will be able to come up with a comprehensive resolution that will improve reproductive health for women everywhere. The delegation of Cuba is looking forward to seeing what this committee comes up with, and is looking forward to working with the other delegates.

  • Isabellepopp
    Isabellepopp November 14, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Country: France
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    France is strongly for giving women the freedom to do as they please with their bodies. In 2014 France has added an amendment that allows women the right to not have to justify their abortion during the first twelve weeks of their pregnancy. This amendment got rid of a portion of the 1975 law that only allowed women to get an abortion within the first twelve weeks if the pregnancy was causing distress. France will stand behind this amendment regardless of influences from other countries’ views on the topic. This amendment also shows support for single mothers and their motherhood decisions. The women of France do not need to worry whether the cost of the abortion will be an issue, as the government will pay. If any try to obstruct a woman’s right to an abortion, France will consider that a crime.
    France provides funds annually in support of the four main United Nations agencies centered on women’s rights, these organizations being the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and UN Women. France’s supports adds up to more than six million dollars per year to UNFPA and UN Women the main organizations which support the rights of sexual and reproductive health of women. France has also integrated services which cover all aspects of reproductive health which support the use of combined methods and choice of type of service, as well as providing comprehensive sexual education supporting the use of responsible sexual behaviors. France supports further legislation to increase the rights of women regarding reproductive health and believes that reproductive health laws are a principal part of basic human rights, thus, France is willing to collaborate with any country willing to promote the rights of women’s reproductive health.

  • Marlena14655
    Marlena14655 November 14, 2017 Reply

    UN Women
    Reproductive Health
    India
    Marlena Gray

    The fight for womens’ rights has been happening for the past 169 years; fighting for political, social, and economic rights. In recent years, the world has been fighting for womens reproductive health rights. In many countries women are subject to childhood pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases or infections, and other health issues. Young women need to be educated on their bodies and how they can protect themselves from life threatening events. Worldwide,“HIV disproportionately affects women and adolescent girls because of vulnerabilities created by unequal cultural, social and economic status” (“Women and Girls, HIV and AIDS”). In Africa, “In East and Southern Africa young women will acquire HIV five to seven years earlier than their male peers” (“Women and Girls, HIV and AIDS”). This staggering statistic shows the inequality among the sexes. In many countries, once a woman becomes pregnant they lose their opportunity to attend school, work, and their value. “Unintended pregnancies are widespread in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), jeopardizing the health and wellbeing of women and their families.1 These unplanned pregnancies also exert an unnecessary burden on their countries’ health systems and socio economic development” (“Unintended pregnancies in the Middle East and North Africa”). India currently lacks in access to contraception and control over reproductive choices. Due to lack of education, women often give birth too early in life. Nearly 21% pregnancies are either unwanted or mistimed. The public health system fails to provide adequate antenatal care, access to safe abortion, emergency obstetric care, and postnatal care. “Nearly five women die every hour in India from complications developed during childbirth” (“5 Women…”). This frightening statistic represents the need for change, not only in India, but worldwide.

    India became the world’s first nation to launch a family planning programme, in 1951. The International Conference on Population and Development (Cairo, 1994) prompted a change in available programmes, with the advocacy of client-centered and quality-oriented reproductive health approaches, India formulated appropriate policy and programmatic responses. The National Population Policy was created in 2000. This policy encourages governments to promote voluntary and informed choice. The National Rural Health Mission, created in 2005, seeks to provide accessible, affordable, and quality healthcare to the rural population. The Conditional Cash Transfer, started in 2008, addresses financial barriers for access to health services. The UNFPA currently works in India, to support the Reproductive and Child Health II (RCH-II) programme, aimed at reducing maternal mortality, child mortality, as well as supply a range of quality contraceptive services. These interventions focus on empowering community-based organizations and village-based health/sanitation committees to monitor service provision and articulate community perspectives on access and quality of reproductive health services. (“Sexual & Reproductive Health”).
    India supports the increase of education to rural regions, increase of health services, and increase in research for better options. India suggests that all governments send people to communities to advise citizens the best health options for them. The emphasis should be shifted from curative medicine to preventive medicine. Education is the most important service a government can supply to women, to increase their reproductive health.

    Works Cited
    “5 Women Die Every Hour during Childbirth in India: WHO – Times of India.” The Times of India, India, 16 June 2016, timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/5-women-die-every-hour-during-childbirth-in-India-WHO/articleshow/52781552.cms.

    ROUDI-FAHIMI, FARZANEH. “UNINTENDED PREGNANCIES IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA.” Inform Empower Advance, July 2010, http://www.prb.org/pdf10/unintendedpregnancies.pdf.

    “Sexual & Reproductive Health.” UNFPA India | Sexual & Reproductive Health, 18 Oct. 2017, india.unfpa.org/topics/sexual-reproductive-health-10.

    “Women and Girls, HIV and AIDS.” AVERT, 27 July 2017, http://www.avert.org/professionals/hiv-social-issues/key-affected-populations/women.

  • Royzieglerh70
    Royzieglerh70 November 14, 2017 Reply

    November 14, 2017
    SUBMITTED TO: UN Women
    FROM: Namibia
    SUBJECT: Reproductive Health

    The country of Namibia is an avid believer in reproductive health being a key stepping stone to a better world. As a young, representative democracy, Namibia is aware of the challenges reproductive health can pose to a growing population and its crucialness in any developed society. Namibia fully acknowledges the progress that must be made to improve reproductive health, and recognizes the measures taken since it’s self determination in 1990. Namibian reproductive health expenditure per woman is higher than most African countries, but the country still finds great importance in bettering the reproductive health of its population.

    Namibia recognizes the progress that must be made in terms of reproductive health, both domestically and internationally. With that said, education of positive family planning and contraceptive methods is of high priority to Namibia. This education has the power to decrease both maternal mortality and HIV/AIDS, which are both key goals outlined for Namibia’s sustainable development. Another top priority is supporting the economic and social empowerment of women. Namibia believes that by empowering women of all ages, positive reproductive choices will follow. The country also recognizes the importance of respecting the cultural practices that impact a population’s views on reproductive health. Namibia believes that respect for these practices will help create a stable foundation to grow upon. With that said, the country is immensely devoted to bettering the reproductive health of its population.

    Namibia wishes to know how this committee will handle the conflicting views between cultural practices and advancements in modern healthcare. Namibia feels the implications that prevent access to care should also be handled with utmost seriousness, and wonders the ways that access to healthcare can be improved for rural populations that do not have the proper means to travel for care.

    Namibia will feel satisfied with solutions to this conflict when a balance is struck between the resounding cultural effects of change and safety. With its large tribal population, Namibia emphasizes that a resolution must include an action plan for how culture and healthcare can coexist as a country adapts to changes. Namibia also feels that it is a necessity to educate women on the importance of safe reproductive habits, and an action plan for this education must be addressed. In coherence with an education plan, a successful resolution will address the prevalence of STIs and maternal mortality in both the developing and developed world.

    Namibia’s National Policy for Reproductive Health guides its policy. This document poses the goal to “promote and protect the health of individuals and families through the provision of equitable, acceptable, accessible and affordable quality reproductive health services.” Namibia also recognizes its Vision 2030 plan, which vows to “incorporate strategies on women’s health issues into existing legislation to ensure reproductive rights for girls and women.” Additionally, Namibia recognizes the UN General Assembly Resolution 2011, which encourages women to “execute their right to attain the highest standard of reproductive health, and to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence.”

    In short, Namibia is fully supportive of enhancing reproductive health for all and looks forward to collaborating with the international community to do so. Namibia is very dedicated to reaching its many esteemed goals, and the advancement of reproductive health is no exception. The priorities outlined are formed with the intention of sustaining development both internationally and domestically, and Namibia strives to accomplish this with its people’s best interest in mind. With that said, Namibia is entirely willing to work with other countries who value reproductive health as it does.

  • Joliefoor
    Joliefoor November 14, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Country: The People’s Republic of China
    Jolie Foor

    After years of enforcing a family planning policy that restricted couples in urban areas to one child, China adopted a different policy strategy in 2015, allowing families to have two children, and to enable its people to make informed reproductive health choices. China has responded to previous UN recommendations, and recognizes the importance of meeting the reproductive needs of individuals within the framework of human rights, instead of meeting demographic goals. Together with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), China has put in place a series of programs to improve citizens’ access to reproductive health and family planning services. This effort has given over 745 million Chinese men and women access to reproductive planning methods without discrimination from service providers. 39.4% of the program expenses goes to evidence-based policymaking, 39.3% of these resources go to integrated sexual and reproductive health services, 11.6% goes to gender equality, and 9.7% goes to adolescents and youth. Additionally, total spending on integrated sexual and reproductive health services reached over $760,000 in 2016.

    Furthermore, China’s “Mother’s Health Express Train” project delivers health knowledge and services to rural women, including health checks and distribution of drug and health data. This project started in 2003, and has been funded by the Bank of China and other crowd sourced-funding. Projects similar to this could be implemented in other countries where reproductive health education and contraceptives need to be distributed. China warns the committee of the dangers of simply providing development funds to women in need of contraceptives, as this may lead to an abuse of the system, with women using that money to buy other necessities or goods.

    In addition, China recognizes that undermining access to family planning education and services will deny women in poorer countries the tools needed to form health security. The absence of programs provided through funds drive women towards unsafe and illegal abortion, which jeopardizes their health, resulting in many unneeded deaths. The People’s Republic of China encourages developed countries to contribute funds to reproductive measures to ensure the safety of women in the world. The removal of a woman’s choice to terminate pregnancies will severely strain family incomes in the future and lead to a rise in maternal mortality as a result of unsafe abortions. Since resources are limited, they should be allocated. China recommends that UN Women adjunct the allocation of resources to focus on development in rural areas, calling on developed countries to increase their contribution to this.

  • avatar image
    Veronica Gilbert November 14, 2017 Reply

    Country: Sweden
    Topic Area: Reproductive Health
    Delegate: Veronica Gilbert

    The United Nations Charter encourages the general assembly to discuss and consider the principles of Women’s Reproductive Health. However, despite the push to address these dire issues women are still deprived of essential reproductive rights. This leaves more women at risk for sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies, and female genital mutilation. In addition, there are definite inequalities in women’s reproductive health standards around the world that need to be addressed, some of these include the right to autonomy, the right of choice, and informed consent. Sexual education and women’s reproductive rights is also imperative for nations to fully support women.

    Being that more than half the world’s population are women, Sweden believes that women must have essential rights to their own reproductive systems. As said by Gudrun Schyman spokesperson of the Feminist Initiative, “sexual and reproductive rights give freedom and empowerment to women and it is the only way they can achieve their goals.” Sweden has also had compulsory sex education in schools since 1955. Since 1975 abortion has been free and does not require parental permission, and contraceptives are easy to get and relatively cheap. Sweden annually spends 17 million euros on HIV/AIDS and STD prevention. Some of this money has sponsored many trips to Africa educate gender equality and stop the spread of HIV/AIDS.

    Sweden, in order to build a healthier future, believes that it is essential to promote knowledge and openness with youth whether that be by increasing sexual education and reproductive right classes or other education programs. In addition Sweden want all women to have complete control of their reproductive health by bettering sexual and reproductive health services for nations that lack resources.

    http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/csw/issues.htm
    http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/csw/shalev.htm
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-el-salvador-abortion/sweden-welcomes-salvadoran-woman-wrongly-jailed-for-abortion-in-asylum-first-idUSKBN1771QP
    http://www.manskligarattigheter.se/en/human-rights/what-rights-are-there/sexual-and-reproductive-health-and-rights-srhr

  • Rose5236
    Rose5236 November 15, 2017 Reply

    SUBMITTED TO: UN Women
    FROM: Botswana
    SUBJECT: Reproductive Health

    Presently, young women around the world are dying from sexually transmitted diseases. Most present is HIV/AIDS. Currently, the UNFPA is one organization working towards universal rights when it comes to reproductive health. This includes family planning. Research shows that over the past decade, the amount of transmitted HIV has been decreasing. Botswana is glad to see that HIV is being transmitted less, but is still nonetheless concerned about the people who still have to live with HIV and AIDS every day. Despite advances in eliminating HIV, a fifth of Botswana’s adults still face this fatal virus. This fact is distressing and frankly, unacceptable.

    In Botswana, we are currently researching cures and solutions for the high concentration of HIV/AIDS prevalent in our population. Our nation has been starting to have options of many different contraceptives. The nation of Botswana, along with 10 other countries, are receiving support from the United Kingdom to go through with these contraceptives.

    Botswana would like to see funds being redistributed to helping the reproductive health of women all over the world in a resolution. When writing a resolution on this topic it is vital to use these fund in order to benefit women who cannot afford the life-saving treatment used to treat HIV/AIDS. The delegation of Botswana also hopes that in this resolution we can support the continuation of good reproductive health within the female community.

    In conclusion, Botswana hopes for a resolution that includes funds for HIV/AIDS victims who are less economically capable of treatment. The delegation of Botswana is confident that that resolutions will be found, and will lead to the eventual prevention of this virus worldwide.

    • Rose5236
      Rose5236 November 22, 2017 Reply

      Delegate Name: Annie Cardinale
      School: Royal Oak High School
      Delegation: Botswana
      Committee: UN Women

  • 20ellefsem
    20ellefsem November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Portugal
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Women´s Access to Healthcare
    Delegate: Emma Ellefson-Frank

    For decades, women in countries all around the world have been struggling to gain basic rights over their own bodies. Included in this quest for equal protection under the law are problems with access to contraception, safe abortion, and information about family planning. This lack of interest and funding from governments and citizens alike has led to an elevated death rate of young women from STDs and illegal abortions.This should be of concern to all nations with governments promising to do the best for their people because it concerns half of their population.
    To begin with, Portugal has recently become aware of the errors in its policies concerning women’s healthcare. In a single year 5,000 women were hospitalized as a result of illegal abortions. In an effort to combat this startling statistic, Portugal passed a law in 2007 allowing abortion up until 10 weeks into the pregnancy. Additionally the use of condoms and reliable birth control pills have gone up almost 5% since 1997. Portugal looks favorably upon changes in policies about sexual and reproductive health. Although Portugal has made recent advancements in terms of women’s healthcare, anything too radical would not be in Portugal’s best interests.
    In response to this issue of women’s access to healthcare, Portugal would like to suggest a plan that allows for distribution and easy access of both male and female contraceptives. This would allow for fewer unplanned pregnancies and therefore fewer illegal abortions. Additionally Portugal is interested in better educating young people in terms of family planning and sexual education. However Portugal is not interested in any laws allowing abortion past 10 weeks. Support in this matter would be expected from countries with firm stances on abortions but flexibility with concerns of other forms of birth control. Some of these countries would include but are not limited to, Chile and El Salvador.

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    Natasha November 15, 2017 Reply

    Chile recognizes the right of a woman to terminate a pregnancy in three major cases with the recent August law, formed on August 21st of this current year. If the fetus is unviable, if the woman’s life is endangered, and in the case of a male maliciously raping the victimized female which then results in unwanted pregnancy. For years, we had failed to recognize these women with such viable reasons to terminate the fetus, but now Chile recoggnizes these women. Even though the August law aids the major causes for a woman to abort the fetus, there is still room for more improvement. Chile also believes that a woman should not be forced to keep a fetus if the woman cannot afford to raise the child, if she does not have what is necessary to support a child (housing, partner, and/or mental health), and any other sexual violence other than rape.

    Multiple Chilean women who were criminalized for seeking to terminate a pregnancy from doctors or other medical professionals were reported by those same professionals that they had asked for help. Therefore, reminding us that in order to have complete equality for women- including their reproductive rights, that the professionals must support the individuals seeking help and not turn them away. With the August Law being our first stepping stone of hopefully many more to come, Chile would gladly work with other countries who also value womens’ reproductive rights and want to further womens’ rights to their own bodies.

    Works Cited
    Mooney, Jadwiga E. Pieper. “The Long Road to Reproductive Rights in Chile.” NACLA, Jadwiga E. Pieper Mooney, 19 Sept. 2017, nacla.org/news/2017/09/27/long-road-reproductive-rights-chile.

  • 18ClaypoRy
    18ClaypoRy November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Canada
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Reproductive Rights
    Delegate: Ryan Claypool

    Reproductive rights are an important issue. For years countries across the world have been pushing for more women’s rights particularly reproductive ones. Many nations that are not as industrialized such as El Salvador, Haiti, or Hondurs lack reproductive rights due to economic circumstances. Even nations that are industrialized such as China and the United States lack in reproductive rights due to societal and governmental restrictions on women issues. Given the amount of women without basic reproductive rights, there is a huge push to help promote education on family planning and certain methods of birth control to help reduce pregnancies in populated countries. Young girls are also the victims of genital mutilation in countries were radical beliefs may stem from religion or societal standards, which has no benefits for women’s health in anyway. Girls are also forced into unwanted planned marriages due to faith or culture beliefs and standards, which can lead to abusive or unstable marriages. As a result there is an increasing chance for women of all ages to contract a disease like HIV/AIDS, herpes, and gonorrhea due to lack of resources to have safe sex and can possibly transmit such diseases during unexpected pregnancies.

    Canada in the last decade has invested more of its time, money, and resources to help women gain more and better reproductive rights. Canada is one of the new countries that does not have criminal laws restricting abortion at all. However, women in Canada still deal with reproductive issues when it comes to abortion, the main issue is low numbers of clinics that can do abortion. 90% of Canada’s population lives within 100 miles away from the United States border. Even though there is a small portion of women not within those 100 miles they still do not have easy access to clinics in the northern portion of the country. Still today two-third of Canada’s abortions are still done in hospitals, the government also pays for any abortion service in hospitals. In 2017, the government pushed for spending $650 million dollars out of our own budget to help provide resources and advocate for women’s rights and fight global anti abortion laws in 125 countries (mainly African and Middle-Eastern nations); which have made abortion illegal in many of their countries. The money would go to advocacy groups to fight for certain rights for women reproduction. Canada’s government spending would also try to reduce the twenty-two million unsafe abortion that take place. Care Canada donated three million to prevent early or forced marriages in Benin. It is part of Canada’s agenda to help reach out the all corners of the globe to fight this issue: an issue that each woman in every nation should have the right to deal with.

    Canada firmly believes every nation that is a part of the United Nations that has the economic capabilities of donating money for women’s reproductive rights should do so, for the betterment of the women across the world. Since many countries do not support or advocate for women’s reproductive rights, women rely on economic help from other nations such as Canada, the U.S. and European nations. Canada plans to sponsor or co-sponsor a resolution that sees the dangers of not countries not advocating for reproductive rights for women. Seeing the benefits of family planning education, birth control methods, and proper healthcare for women. These objectives can prevent a country from dealing with the spread for infectious diseases and also see a decrease in genital mutilation and sexual assault. While fighting against young girls being forced into early marriages as it should not be morally right in any country. The promotion of a basic education system as a whole could help young men and women understand the importance of safe sex, and see the opportunities the world has to offer before having a child with a proper education. At the same time nations should help fund clinics in countries that work strictly on women’s reproductive issues and can help prevent the spread of diseases and making it affordable to women in need.

  • Elijonlogan
    Elijonlogan November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Country: Pakistan
    Elijah Logan
    Abortion rights and reproductive health rights have been a controversial topic in the modern world. Some governments have provided near completely unrestricted access to contraception and abortion, while others outlaw and castigate abortion. Over 56 million abortion occur each year, and 21.6 million of these are unsafe abortions. Every year, 47,000 women die from abortion-related complications, mostly in developing countries. 36% of women report not using contraception, and many report unintended pregnancies. Many women report unmet needs for family planning and reproductive services, and less than ½ of needs are met in 54 countries, and less than ¾ of needs are met in 74 countries. Countries across the world have varying states of abortion and contraception access, from near illegality in the Dominican Republic and Malta, to near complete access in China and Canada. Many countries have unequal access for women in rural and non-urban areas, and abortions are sometimes permitted based on race and sex.
    Pakistan has an above average Maternal Mortality Ratio of 340 per 100,000, and pregnant women often have complications before, during and after pregnancy. To prevent pregnancy, around 35% of Pakistani women use contraception, an exceptionally low number. Many Muslims in Pakistan believe that their religion prohibits use of contraception.”Family planning is wrong and un-Islamic if it is practiced routinely,” Mohammad Zakaria, an expert Islamic scholar from one of the oldest Islamic schools, says. “If it permanently stops a woman from becoming pregnant, it is harmful and illegal.” But Islamic scholars have determined that abortion is permissible in the country up to 120 days of pregnancy, which is clearly reflected in the numbers: 54% of unintended pregnancies end in abortion.
    The Islamic Republic of Pakistan wishes to improve safety for pregnant women, protect the life of the unborn, and reduce population growth in Pakistan by taking a nuanced approach to abortion and contraception to ensure reproductive rights while preventing innocent children from being exposed to unsavory procedures like abortion. There must be a balance between the life of the child and the sovereignty of a woman’s body, one that protects children from concepts of sex and other haram topics.

  • avatar image
    Molly November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Venezuela
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Delegate: Molly Bowling
    School: Williamston High School

    The main issue relating to this topic is women’s reproductive health. This can be a result of economic hardships, absence of education, religious restrictions, and limited access to birth control. Many women and girls have been faced with an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases when they do not have control over their own reproductive health. Today, women constitute more than half of all people worldwide living with HIV and AIDS-related illnesses which remain the leading cause of death for women of the reproductive age around the world. The United Nations must determine what actions can and cannot be taken to prevent further controversy.

    Venezuela has great interest in resolving this conflict because this is an issue that affects them directly. Venezuela is the country with the highest rate of teen pregnancy in South America. Their lack of contraception is especially problematic. In Venezuela abortion is only legal when a woman’s life is in danger. In situations where it is necessary to preserve her health or mental state, where she has been raped, if the foetus has birth defects, or for economic reasons, abortion is not legal. Because of these rules, women put themselves in danger by getting the procedure done by an untrained physician, and in an unsanitary facility, or doing the abortion themselves. In Venezuela, abortions cost about 4-6,000bs (about two to three months of minimum wage) and the vast majority of women cannot pay. This has resulted in sixteen percent of maternal deaths (of women aged twelve to forty nine) caused by complications resulting from clandestine abortions, making them the second highest cause of death of women in that age range in Venezuela.

    Venezuela plans to resolve this issue by providing abortion life lines where volunteers provide information about abortion options, and how to use/find Misoprostol. The Committee on the Rights of the Child repeatedly demonstrated its firm commitment to realizing adolescents’ sexual and reproductive rights. The CRC urged the Holy See to review its position on abortion and provide Catholic school students sexual and reproductive health education which will result in the decrease of women contracting sexually transmitted diseases. The CRC is a model for other countries to immulate as they strive to expand the rights if women.

  • Lewiash
    Lewiash November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Country: Brazil
    Delegate: Asha Lewis

    The United Nations Women’s Watch reports that compromises to women’s health can be categorized in four ways: health needs related to sexual and reproductive functions, reproductive dysfunction, disease, and social diseases such as female genital mutilation, sexual abuse and domestic violence. Measures to combat specifically gender-related health issues, such as sexual reproductive functions and social diseases, are commonly left unresolved because of deep rooted antipathies towards contraception and reproductive rights. Brazil faces similar issues in reproductive rights for women, but with the proper reform, looks to solve this global issue and set an example for other countries to follow.
    Following the termination of militant rule in Brazil, reproductive health movements began to emerge, most notably the National Feminist Network on Reproductive Health. This organization was founded to monitor the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD)’s Programme of Action. Partnered with HIV activists and other health professionals, the National Feminist Network was able to hold government entities accountable to for the implementation of reproductive health policies. As a result of these policies, Brazil witnessed an increase in the use of contraceptives among married women (81%). These contraceptives, however, have proven to be somewhat ineffective and, since abortion is illegal in Brazil due to deeply entrenched religious beliefs, many women have resorted to sterilization as a safe and viable form of contraception.
    In order to successfully combat the loss of control of women’s reproductive rights, countries must allow outside groups to hold the government accountable for providing proper forms of contraception and implementation of mandated reproductive health policies. The delegation of Brazil does not consider abortion to be a form of contraception, however, we understand that contraception is a necessity. Therefore, we propose that the solution to this global problem is manifest in effective forms of contraception such as sterilization. With this frame of mind, the delegation of Brazil looks forward to working with other countries to find a solution to this ongoing global issue.

    Works cited:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4318082/
    http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/csw/issues.htm

  • Gcmclean
    Gcmclean November 15, 2017 Reply

    United Nations Women Committee
    Reproductive Health
    Norway
    Grace McLean

    Generally, women across the world are subject to violence, sexual abuse, laws that prohibit them from having full control over their own bodies, and are grossly uneducated about reproductive health and sexual education. Because of this lack of knowledge about basic health, women often become involuntarily pregnant and are not allowed the resources they need to make decisions for themselves. In many places around the world, abortion is strictly banned. This causes more deaths than would occur if abortion were legal for those women because of dangerous measures they take as their only other option. According to the Guttmacher Institute, “up to 44,000 women die each year as a result of unsafe abortions” (Guttmacher Institute). In cases where unsafe abortions were not performed, babies are born, increasing the population to unhealthy amounts. Unfortunately, violence against women is also a global issue. World Health Organization estimates that “every third woman is exposed to physical and / or sexual violence at least once a year” (WHO). Violence may come in the form of sexual, physical, and mental abuse and is often rooted in traditions, religion, or the beliefs of the area. In many of the same places where abortion is considered unethical and therefore banned, this violence is common. Violence against women is also used strategically in conflict situations. Norway remains fairly progressive in that Norwegian women are offered easy access to contraceptives and reserve the right to free health services during pregnancy and childbirth. Although there are a variety of countries similar to Norway in the rights female citizens receive, the United Nations must take significant and immediate action to improve the status of reproductive rights of women around the world.

    Women in Norway are fortunate in comparison to women in other regions of the world because we guarantee them certain freedoms. Emergency contraception is widely distributed and available at pharmacies, schools, family planning clinics, and gas stations, and general contraception is included in national policies for family planning. Although there is no national policy for reimbursement on emergency contraception, it is often delivered free of charge to young people and those in vulnerable populations, and is always delivered to rape victims. Induced abortion in Norway is at an all-time low due to “a large reduction in the number of unwanted pregnancies among women under 25 years of age” (Stai NIPH), but abortion is still provided for through the public health policy depending on the weeks of gestation of the fetus. Norway recently increased its annual level of support to their SRHR (Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights) program from 140 million USD to 225 million USD, and participates actively in the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) and Commission on Population and Development (CPD). Even so, there is still much to be done in order to achieve unbiased health services, because most private health organizations are run by men and therefore are subject to knowledge and practices that are based on “an unconscious male norm” (Gender in Norway). Because of this, many illnesses that females are prone to are not prioritized, and are comparatively underresourced. Pregnant women are often discriminated against in the workplace, and equal pay is yet an unachieved goal. Women who take maternity leave are consequently paid even less. Norway continues to “emphasize and support the mandate of various UN Agencies” (Brattskar) and make sure that they advocate and support sexual and reproductive health and rights.

    Although Norway in generally progressive in its policies on women’s reproductive health and rights, its national gender issues more or less the same as those found internationally. In order to ensure ideal reproductive rights for women in Norway and globally, the UN must first and foremost decrease significantly violence against women. Reproductive health and rights for women is not a possibility without this decrease in violence. Although it is difficult to change the ideologies and traditions of a region-which is what a majority of violence stems from-it is necessary to inform citizens of those regions of other mindsets. A way the UN can achieve this is to better educate women in these areas. If they are better educated, they may gain higher ground in politics and governmental issues, giving them higher ground in society as well. If men in these countries think of women less as objects and of more importance, the amount of violence may decrease. Certain measures of force may also be necessary, because violence often grows from more violence. Another method would be to work with countries that do not allow safe and legal abortions to women on demand. This would result in significantly less deaths due to unsafe abortions and allow women more control over their own bodies. By taking these first steps, the UN can begin to work on the persistent problem of inequality and the chain of events that will grant women more political, social, and economic freedom, and the general rights to chose what to do with their own bodies.

    Works Cited
    Brattskar, Hans. “14 September: Norway’s Commitment to the Full Realization of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights.” Norway in Geneva, 15 Sept. 2017, http://www.norway.no/en/missions/wto-un/our-priorities/globalhealth/side-event—14-september–realizing-rights-protecting-sexual-and-reproductive-health-and-rights-in-times-of-backlash/.

    ECEC. “Emergency Contraception in Europe-Norway.” European Consortium for Emergency Contraception, May 2016, http://www.ec-ec.org/emergency-contraception-in-europe/country-by-country-information-2/norway/#pub3.

    Gender in Norway. “Gender in Norway | Health & Reproductive Rights.” Gender.no, 13 Nov. 2014, http://www.gender.no/Topics/16.

    Guttmacher Institute. “Induced Abortion Worldwide.” Guttmacher Institute, Sept. 2017, http://www.guttmacher.org/sites/default/files/factsheet/fb_iaw.pdf.

    Mette Løkeland Stai. “Induced Abortion in Norway – Fact Sheet.” Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Apr. 18ADAD, 2016, http://www.fhi.no/en/hn/statistics/birth-and-pregnancy-statistics/induced-abortion-in-norway/.

    World Health Organization. “Global and Regional Estimates of Violence against Women: Prevalence and Health Effects of Intimate Partner Violence and Non-Partner Sexual Violence.” World Health Organization, 2010, apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/85241/1/WHO_RHR_HRP_13.06_eng.pdf?ua=1.

  • Megancaroline
    Megancaroline November 15, 2017 Reply

    11/14/17
    UN WOMEN
    RUSSIAN FEDERATION
    REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

    Every woman should have the right to her own bodily autonomy. As a country that provides equal access to reproductive healthcare for its citizens, the Russian Federation is supportive of providing women in other parts of the world with the same access. Women that do not have access to reproductive health care are much more susceptible to unplanned, complicated pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections than women that do. Clearly action is needed, but we must pause first and ask ourselves why these issues have not been acted upon in a more significant way. The reason for discrimination and neglect of any group in the first place is prejudice – the cultural attitudes towards that group.

    Russia has been on the front lines of the battle to achieve gender equality. Women in Russia have equal legal rights to men. Abortion, education on the rights of women, programs to reduce health complications due to pregnancy, and measures to reduce the incidence and severity of AIDS-related diseases are all provided by the Russian government. But it, like many countries, it must also consider the impact of the cultural attitudes of its society. While these must be addressed, we also need to consider that measures too quickly or strongly implemented could create a cultural backlash that is in the end counterproductive to the equality we all seek.

    There are fundamental questions this committee needs to answer in any plan. What can we do to change cultural attitudes while avoiding cultural backlash? How can we take responsibility for promoting women’s health while taking into account cultural and economic factors that affect our ability to do so?

    To answer these questions, there are things the committee must take into account. Every country is different. The idea that the same standards can apply to every country is absurd. Countries, the entities best able to analyze their own cultures and economies, must be responsible for making their own standards in any kind of plan. Secondly, no plan should condemn or accuse a country that does not meet standards set by people outside of that county’s situation. Even while we take responsibility for achieving equality, we must also recognize that finger-pointing will get us nowhere.

    The only way we will accomplish true progress towards equality is if we take into account all perspectives on this issue, even those that might be uncomfortable to hear. Russia expects nothing less of a committee composed of the perspectives of almost all the nations on this earth, and looks forward to creating something that genuinely works towards a more equal world.

  • 18StatteAn
    18StatteAn November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Swaziland
    Committee: UN Women
    Delegate: Anneliese Stattelman
    School: Williamston High School

    When women do not have control over their reproductive rights, they are abject to dangers as a result. The UNHR writes that violations of women’s sexual and reproductive health rights are frequent and take many forms including denial of access to services that only women require, poor quality services, subjecting women’s access to services to third party authorization, and performance of procedures related to women’s reproductive and sexual health without the woman’s consent. Although progression in the way of reproductive health has increased over recent years, there remains much work to do in Swaziland for women regarding their reproductive rights. The government of Swaziland recognizes this and is taking efforts towards reform and growth.
    HIV and AIDS is by far the most pressing sexual and reproductive health challenge, with an estimated HIV prevalence of 27.2% among adults. This rate is the highest in the world, and contributes to existing poverty, and a relatively young population, with 40 percent of citizens being below the age of 15. To illustrate the increasing prevalence of this issue, between 1992 and 2010, HIV prevalence among pregnant women increased from 4% to 41%.
    Another urgent issue is the maternal mortality ratio. In Swaziland 593 of 100,000 live births result in maternal mortality, making the rate rather high. Adolescent birth rate remains high as well, though having declined from 111 births per 1,000 adolescents aged 15-19 years in 2007 to 87 births per 1,000 in 2014. The contraceptive prevalence rate in the country is high (66%) and the unmet need for family planning currently stands at 15%.
    A major contributor to the recent reform is the United Nations Fund for Population Activities Swaziland. UNFPA Swaziland works towards four outcomes: increased availability and use of integrated sexual and reproductive health services (including family planning, maternal health and HIV), increased priority on adolescents, especially on very young adolescent girls, in national development policies and programs, particularly increased availability of CSE and reproductive health services, advanced gender equality, women’s and girls’ empowerment, reproductive rights including for the most vulnerable and marginalized women, adolescents and youth, strengthened national policies and international development agendas through integration of evidence-based analysis on population dynamics and their links to sustainable development, sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights, and HIV and gender equality.
    “UNFPA Swaziland works with the government and civil society partners to strengthen the national capacity to deliver integrated sexual and reproductive health and HIV-prevention programs that are free from stigma and discrimination, including in humanitarian settings.” This is important because despite the high prevalence of HIV, there is still a great deal of stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS in Swaziland. A study conducted in 2012 by SWANEPHA found that nearly half of Swazis refused to go to a clinic for ARVs for fear of being identified as having the illness. A similar study conducted by the ministry of health the same year found that as many as 68% of women who tested HIV-positive were already aware of their status. Simply, an increase in HIV testing can be linked to the decrease of stigma around sexually transmitted disease. UNFPA services work targets young people, particularly the poorest, rural-based and low-educated adolescents and young women.
    Swaziland’s recent programs dedicated to ensuring women have control over their reproductive rights need to be further expanded upon. Educational programs combating the stigma over HIV, for example would benefit the thousands of women who chose to forego treatment for fear of backlash. Swaziland is in favor of expansion upon previously implemented UN programs such as the UNFPA.

  • Tylergrubb
    Tylergrubb November 15, 2017 Reply

    United Nations Women Committee
    Reproductive Health
    State of Israel
    Tyler Grubb

    Reproductive health for women has been limited by economic barriers, religious and cultural views, and the limited amount of education that is readily available. In many developing countries, women’s reproductive rights have been limited to a large support. Whether it is abortion, STD prevention, or contraception access, countries have had difficult times deciding a way to respond to these topics. However, because women face more than half of the world’s population of people living with HIV, and the rate of illegal and unsafe abortions are rising across the world, the United Nations should increase the availability to reproductive rights for women. The lack of defined laws limiting the potential harm against women is allowing the percentage of women who face harmful and deadly outcomes continue. In order for states to foster a safer environment for women and girls, the United Nations must firmly give definition to safe legal abortions, increase a person’s right to reproductive health in all countries.

    Israel has continually promoted safe and accessible ways for women to gain power over their reproductive rights. In 1977, the Israeli Knesset created legislation that stated abortion is legal and will be provided for free for any woman that is under 18 or over 40 and if it will be beneficial to save the live of the woman, to preserve the physical health of the woman, or to preserve mental health. This In 2014, the Israeli Knesset added abortions to be permitted for women between the ages of 20 and 33, no matter the reason, to the national health coverage law. Israel understands the connection between a woman’s health and their ability to participate in education or the economy. Israel works to limit the amount of unwanted pregnancies of young women to allow them the best opportunities to have a desired future. Israel has increased the number of hospitals which allow abortions, which may have been originally limited by religious views of the hospital. Israel has also put a large focus on limiting STDs. Israel has used intensive scientific research to discover new cures and ways to limit the number of people affected by STDs. Israel believes it is important to the general well being of a population to maintain a foundation which protects women’s rights and promotes their safety rather than limit their needs.

    Israel believes, by giving women the ability to access these rights, whether by limiting the laws against reproductive health or promoting the safety of reproductive health, the women will give back to the country to let the country prosper. To do this, Israel believes countries should create a set of rules and regulations that allow safe abortions, available contraception, and easier access to STD health care. To do this, Israel believes a country must educate its doctors on the safest ways to prevent harmful abortions and harmful STD outcomes, and educate its population on the consequences from performing unsafe and illegal abortions and from contracting an STD. Israel believes this committee should put priority to women’s rights to abortions and citizens rights to sex education to limit STDs. A resolution that advocates for women’s rights to safe abortions and STD education will help countries improve the environments of women and girls.

  • Emilykgoff
    Emilykgoff November 15, 2017 Reply

    Abortion is allowed in Iraq in cases of foetal defect, to save the life of the mother, and in cases of rape and incest. Iraq believes that abortion should not be given out just because the mother does not want to have a child. Each child is a precious life that should not be destroyed just because someone does not want it. It is also very unethical to take away a human life, especially when the fetus feels excruciating pain as it is being aborted. Every life begins at conception which means even unborn children have a right to life and should not be killed just because a mother does not to deliver them. There is also a lasting psychological effect on the mother and may make her more prone to mental illness, like depression and anxiety, in the future. Abortions can also affect the mother’s health and future pregnancies. A women with a history of abortion is at a higher risk of miscarriage in her first trimester in a subsequent pregnancy and they are at an increased risk of breast cancer with each abortion.
    While abortions are not available for everyone, Iraq has made birth control accessible to all women if they wish to use it. There are many places in the country women can receive contraceptives to help prevent unwanted pregnancy. Because of this, most women should not need an abortion. They are able to obtain what they need to prevent an unexpected child and avoid the need for an abortion.
    Iraq would like to see that abortions are used only in cases of extreme necessity. Instead of giving abortions to women as a way to deal with unwanted pregnancy, there should be government programs where women are able to get contraceptives that they need to prevent pregnancy.

  • avatar image
    Kate Loope November 15, 2017 Reply

    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Country: Nigeria
    Committee: UN Women

    Reproductive Rights
    Reproductive rights for a woman is still a huge debate in today’s world, and due to religious, or feminist influences, one’s opinion may differ from the next. Nigeria’s standpoint on how reproductive rights are settled upon are that unless the woman is in danger, the abortion of a fetus is outlawed. As the world progresses, so will Nigeria, and women do have the right to abort, but if the woman is not in danger, she must raise the child. The reason for this opinion in Nigeria is due to heavy religious influence. But, as feminism and equal rights movements become more dominant, the ending of child marriages, strict laws on abortion, and the archaic practices of genital mutilation will follow through. In the Northern’s Penal Code, and the Southern Criminal Code, these both allow abortion under very specific circumstances. Although the North is still holds a taboo against this procedure, due to the following of Sharia law of Islam influence, the times have changed, and Nigeria is very slowly developing. A reason abortions are a negative towards this small nation would be population loss. As a third-world country, the steady growing of population could assist Nigeria into becoming stable, but if birth rates rise too fast, it could mean danger. HIV is also another factor affecting many nations. This disease then puts the child in danger, and will soon put a dent in population growth. To solve these issues of HIV and other STDs, abortion rights, and the ending of genital mutilation, nations that are still developing will keep abortion rights as they are stated in the codes. For Nigeria, abortion will only be allowed if the mother is in danger. For HIV and other STDs, the providing of antiretroviral treatments will help mothers and young women grow our population safely. To end genital mutilation, laws and amendments must be placed. Over all, women do have the right to their reproductive system and marriage, but they must follow codes and laws, or their religious ideals. Women should be able to receive treatment for HIV and other STDs, and genital mutilation should be outlawed, unless it is a cultural practice, that is recognized by the state.

  • Laurenrechner
    Laurenrechner November 15, 2017 Reply

    UN Women
    Reproductive Health
    Australia
    Lauren Ahlburg Rechner

    As of 2017, 214 million women in developing countries who want to avoid pregnancy do not have access to contraception. Complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the second leading cause of death for women ages 15 to 19. Globally they cause more than 800 women and girls to die every day. When looking at death, it is important to also look at the balance of how many children are being conceived. The total fertility rate of children per woman in Australia is below the replacement rate of 2.1 children per woman. Globally, countries with policies that provide parents with the fund to balance family life and occupation, and where the financial costs of having children are lower, tend to have higher fertility rates. Women’s education and employment levels do not appear to account for the difference in fertility rates between countries. According to the Australian Medical Association, Australia has lower levels of infant mortality, infant morbidity, and maternal mortality than other developing countries. Australia has shown a long term commitment to both sexual and reproductive health.

    This long term commitment to reproductive health for women in Australia began in 2007. This was the start of a $90.3 million dollar program to New Directions Mothers and Babies Services. This helped Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their mothers by improving their health and wellbeing. In 2008, Jean Hailes Foundation in association with the Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Alliance helped to develop evidence-based guidelines and conduct an education program for health professionals in the community. After the Report of Maternity Services Review was released in 2009, a maternity reform package of $120.5 million over four years called Improving Maternity Services Budget Package. Through 2010-2013 the Australian government funded six different areas to help control and raise awareness about sexually transmitted diseases: $12.5 million to increase awareness about and the pilot of testing program for chlamydia (over five years), $9.8 million to the National STI Health Campaign (over four years), $33.2 million to prevent and treat STIs and BBVs (over two years), $6 million for community-based organizations and prevention centers, $9.2 million for four national research centers, $18 million for education, prevention, and surveillance activities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sexual health. This helped Australian women to have more choice in their maternity care. The Australian Government expects to meet its financial commitments for sexual and reproductive health at the Family Planning 2020 Summit in London. On July 11, 2017, Human Rights Watch expressed this in a letter to Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop. At the summit, more than 36 governments will review progress towards the goal of enabling 120 more million women worldwide to access a modern form of contraception by 2020.

    Australia would like to recommend a more unified approach to reproductive and sexual health knowledge. Australia encourages the UN to seek other alternatives for the age in which women are taught about reproductive health. It is recommended that a national sexuality education program is implemented in all schools. Australia encourages governments to concentrate efforts to explore, fund, and implement innovative ways to increase the prevention of reproductive cancer in communities of high risk women, specifically Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. The goals of the Australian government are to recognize the social and environmental factors in helping women improve overall well being and sexual safety. Australia believes that when working together the UN can help create a healthier system for contraceptives for women globally.

  • Carlsonkaci19
    Carlsonkaci19 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Country: France

    Reproductive rights can be defined in simplest terms as the right of individuals to decide weather to reproduce or have reproductive health. The different reproductive rights range and include rights such as access to family planning, use contraceptives, right to terminate a pregnancy and the right to reproductive education in schools. France views these rights as an essential part of freedom. In 2014, we justified and allowed women the right to terminate a pregnancy during the first twelve weeks of the pregnancy if they choose. This differs from previous laws that only allowed this choice if the pregnancy was causing health issues and distress to the mother. The enforcement of this new law is a testament to the strides that France believes in making towards better and more reliable reproductive rights for the women in the country. It is our view as well as opinion, that these same ideas and freedoms should be followed by all members of the U.N.
    As a supporter of the rights of Women globally as well as within France, we are committed to providing safe and affordable access to reproductive services for Women. In France, the government will pay the cost of abortion in support of single mothers to ensure safety and health. France believes that a vital part of the movement of reproductive health lies with reproduction education in schools. This is one way that we are looking into educating and ensuring that our population has the ability and access to make the right decision for their body as well as situation. As a delegation, while we are firm in our views and beliefs, we would be open to hearing what other delegates have to bring to the table and other solutions they may offer. We look forward to working with everyone in the UN Women committee.

  • Benarmbrester
    Benarmbrester November 15, 2017 Reply

    UN Women Committee
    Reproductive Health
    United States of America
    Dawson Benjamin Armbrester

    The United State’s policy on women’s reproductive rights is to support and fund programs that include pro-life policy and are strictly against coerced abortions. Since 1973, the famed U.S. supreme court case Roe v Wade has made it legal for women in the United States to have an abortion. Worldwide, there are roughly 85 million unplanned pregnancies each year and half of those pregnancies end in abortion. That is millions upon millions of babies being innocently killed because women do not have the necessary contraceptive methods. Since 1965, in the U.S. supreme court case Griswold v connecticut, married couples in the United States have had the right to use contraceptives to prevent many unplanned pregnancies that end up in abortion. Also, the United States is a major supporter of sex education and women’s health services as long as they are not accompanied by abortion services. President Trump represents this by saying, “I am pro-life and I am deeply committed to investing in women’s health and plan to significantly increase federal funding in support of non-abortion services such as cancer screenings.” For organizations, such as Planned Parenthood and UNFPA, the federal government is defunding them unless they stop providing abortion services.

    The U.S. continues to support the sovereignty of member nations to make their own women’s reproductive health policy. Rather than funding organizations like the UNFPA, the funding will be diverted to other programs to support reproductive health under the U.S.’s Global Health Programs. Women worldwide suffer through child marriage, genital mutilation, sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy related deaths. To help combat these issues, Nikki Haley outlines the United States policy on women’s reproductive health by saying, “We should encourage every country to support women’s basic rights, and we should help them in any way that we can. But we should also call out any country that is not supporting these basic rights and let them know that we will not stand for it.” Although the United States supports other countries, it still maintains the importance of remaining sovereign so it can make its own decisions regarding women’s health issues and its ability to protect the right to life for all people can not be hindered.

  • Lia_bommarito
    Lia_bommarito November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Germany
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    School: Williamston High School
    Delegate: Lia Bommarito

    Globally, the struggle for reproductive rights has been an ongoing struggle, mostly since the feminist movements of the late twentieth century. Difference in the progression of reproductive health per nation is astounding; while some women in developed countries argue for the right to abortion, other women in developing nations struggle with more violent, pressing, and dangerous issues such as genital mutilation. Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a practice often occurring in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, where the genitals of a female – usually a young girl – are cut off for non-medical reasons: religion, culture, and gender roles play a part in these “procedures”. Over thirty countries today have documented FGM. Regardless of cause, FGM presents an alarming situation; although it is a violent, destructive process, genital mutilation can be a hallmark of culture for these nations, and therefore insensitive for the international community to regulate. As for abortion, many nations’ affiliation with various religious sects can prevent them from supporting women’s access to abortion, and while their culture shapes these viewpoints, oftentimes women who cannot legally receive an abortion turn to illegal, unsafe practices. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), every 8 minutes a woman in a developing nation will die of complications arising from an unsafe abortion. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cannot take a hard stance against one’s culture, the CDC recognizes that one main goal for reproductive health is improving maternal mortality.

    For Germany, the journey for reproductive rights has been a long and perilous one. German citizens are allowed to receive abortions within the first trimester, and if there is a proven rape or incestuous situation, but otherwise, abortion is seen as a criminal act against a fetus. Contraceptives such as condoms are available publically, but if women want to go on any sort of birth control, they must be prescribed so by a doctor. Germany’s leading reproductive health organization is called ProFamilia, and it acts as a clinic and support center for women. If women are given permission by a doctor, ProFamilia provides safe, legal abortions, and also counseling, as well as information about sexuality, disability, and women’s health. It is a pro-choice center; however, much of Germany’s population is against abortion, viewing it as a violent and criminal murder against fetuses. Another of ProFamilia’s goals is to improve and address infringements of women’s rights in “(for example), Afghanistan.” This hallmarks another of Germany’s positions on the topic; although the nation itself is not incredibly pressed about furthering women’s rights, as they are in a comfortable position of progress, they feel that the international community features many nations whose law codes and cultures oppress women and do not address fundamental reproductive health.

    Moving forward, the international community must prioritize. Nations like Germany (the United Kingdom, the United States, France) should not be the focus. While they are still struggling with internal activist pushes and calls to action, in comparison to many developing nations, Germany and co. are in a progressive and comfortable position. In relation to developing nations, Germany plans to focus on how culture and religion oftentimes subjugate women. While it can be a touchy subject, genital mutilation is incredibly violent and something that 80 percent of women said that she or her children suffered from in a 2015 poll of African women. It may be difficult to tackle because of its relation and importance to cultural ties, but Germany plans to begin an educational campaign targeting misconceptions about female reproductive health in willing developing nations. This campaign would focus on the misconception that some girls need to be rid of their sexuality or promiscuity – or cut in the practice of FGM – to be pure and ensure virginity for marriage. An educational program would ideally focus on lack of violence and the teachings of safe contraception for women in developing nations. This program would travel to different areas with higher populations, whether that is a city or village. Germany feels that the violence and subjugation of women’s health in developing nations, and in countries that are in the Middle East, Asia and Africa, is the most important and urgent issue relating to this topic, and therefore it is dually appropriate to focus more on solving than developed nations’. However, Germany feels that giving women limited access to abortion – say, in the first trimester – is also crucial to prevent unsafe and illegal pregnancies, which oftentimes raise the maternal mortality rate. In committee, Germany would prefer to work with nations such as France, Spain, and the United Kingdom, but also would like to collaborate with nations from developing regions, especially those with high FGM rates, such as Somalia, Sierra Leone, and Mali.

  • avatar image
    Cristina Gardner November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee- UN Women
    Topic- Women’s Reproductive Rights
    Country- Azerbaijan

    Women’s reproductive health status in our country is not a priority. But we would like to ensure gender equality at all levels and spheres. Little is known about the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and reproductive health in, or around our country. WIth the end of the Soviet union, many state programs focusing on the needs of women, such as family systems and child care support, were eliminated. With poor nutrition and childhood anemia are causing us to take a step back and assess this issue. 38.4 %of our pregnant women tested positive for anemia. But what worries us more is the growing HIV and STIs. While the sex trafficking of women is becoming of greater concern, we worry about the spreading of sexually transmitted diseases. The women contracting these diseases can be detrimental to the health of our men. For these reasons, we believe A National Program for Reproductive Health should be put into place as soon as possible. In 1997, the Health Care Act was adopted, in which men and women are seen as having equal rights to health care. At the same time, several articles of this law for women prescribe specific conditions related to the reproductive functions. Programs were adopted for preventive measures for combating diseases, for strengthening the immune system, for combating HIV/AIDS, and for reproductive health and family planning. High quality services for women who are in their childbearing years have been made available as well. We would like the women to feel comfortable with their reproductive health, making our babies strong and healthy.

  • avatar image
    Christina Gardner November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee- UN Women
    Topic- Women’s Reproductive Rights
    Country- Azerbaijan

    Women’s reproductive health status in our country is not a priority. But we would like to ensure gender equality at all levels and spheres. Little is known about the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and reproductive health in, or around our country. WIth the end of the Soviet union, many state programs focusing on the needs of women, such as family systems and child care support, were eliminated. With poor nutrition and childhood anemia are causing us to take a step back and assess this issue. 38.4 %of our pregnant women tested positive for anemia. But what worries us more is the growing HIV and STIs. While the sex trafficking of women is becoming of greater concern, we worry about the spreading of sexually transmitted diseases. The women contracting these diseases can be detrimental to the health of our men. For these reasons, we believe A National Program for Reproductive Health should be put into place as soon as possible. In 1997, the Health Care Act was adopted, in which men and women are seen as having equal rights to health care. At the same time, several articles of this law for women prescribe specific conditions related to the reproductive functions. Programs were adopted for preventive measures for combating diseases, for strengthening the immune system, for combating HIV/AIDS, and for reproductive health and family planning. High quality services for women who are in their childbearing years have been made available as well. We would like the women to feel comfortable with their reproductive health, making our babies strong and healthy.

  • Rdooley
    Rdooley November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Country: Republic of Korea

    Women in the Republic of Korea are protected by law against rape or any other kind of sexual assault. Korea takes these crimes very seriously and do not hesitate to give women the rights they deserve when it comes to the governing of their own bodies. Women in the Republic of Korea are free to choose how many children they wish to have, and when they wish to have them. Women enjoy many maternal health services in the event of childbirth. In cases where a mother’s health is in serious danger, or in instances of rape or incest, women are legally permitted to an abortion before the twenty-fourth week of pregnancy. If a woman chooses not to have children, contraceptives are widely available to them without discrimination.Schoolchildren in Korea have sexual education available to them, making more aware of their reproductive health and safety.
    Recently, the birth rate in the Republic of Korea has been at an alarming low, and the Korean Government acknowledges illegal abortions as one of the major causes of this. Along with a crackdown on these underground activities, Korea will take steps toward creating a new message for our people, one that says that children are the future, not unpatriotic anomalies.
    In this committee, the Republic of Korea hopes to pass resolutions that encourage opposing states to grant women their reproductive rights. Korea may also suggest that the cap on medical payments be visited, as we find that that may be a driving factor for these illegal abortions. The Republic of Korea believes that if the policies created are within reason, a consensus can be reached.

  • Madikoresh
    Madikoresh November 15, 2017 Reply

    November 15, 2017
    UN Women
    South Africa
    Reproductive Health

    Women’s reproductive health around the world is an issue that needs to be discussed. In many countries women do not have control over their own bodies. Young girls can be married off and pregnant when they are not ready, as well as many STDs circulating and causing harm to themselves and future children. This means, women’s reproductive health does not only affect them. The delegation of South Africa see Women’s Reproductive Health as an extensive issue plaguing the world. South Africa strongly believes that women have the right over their bodies and the choice to with it as they see fit.

    The Constitution of South Africa protects the rights of citizens to make their own decisions regarding their reproductive health. It also gives women healthcare services to access ensure safe pregnancy and childbirth. Abortion is legal and has been legal in South Africa since the Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act was passed in 1996; however many women, aboout 30%, do not know this. They instead will go a far length to get an illegal abortion. South Africa hopes to in the future make it known that abortion is legal and that every women is given women’s healthcare services.

    South Africa hopes to show all delegations that women have the right over their bodies and their reproductive health. This committee need to focus first on understanding women reproductive health as a right, then we need to introduce programs to ensure women have an easy access to what they may need. The delegation of South Africa is hoping for a resolution that helps to improve women’s healthcare.

  • Jen.bell18
    Jen.bell18 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Country: Belgium
    Topic: Reproductive Health

    Providing women with access to reproductive health care is essential to achieving gender equality. Internationally, women are denied access to birth control, abortions, and stigma-free knowledge about sexual health, as well as being subject to domestic violence, rape, female-genital mutilation, and forced marriages. HIV/AIDS is becoming a feminized disease because women are denied access to reproductive healthcare. Limited access to sexual and reproductive health and rights furthers gender inequality.
    To ensure the equality, safety, and health of women, it is imperative to provide equal access to reproductive health services. In order to do this, societies need to change the way gender norms and constructs are viewed and upheld. The rights and health of women need to be prioritized above the continuation of cultural norms. Belgium has implemented programs to analyze the cultural impact of norms regarding gender and sexuality. This analysis will help to adequately implement a transformative approach to addressing sexual and reproductive health and rights, both in policy and society. This approach of analyzing and understanding the norms of cultures and implementing policy based on the needs of the society should be adopted in international policy. Belgium seeks to support organizations and community leaders that promote gender equality, reproductive rights, and the advancement of women, girls and the LGBTI community. Women’s right to reproductive health care needs to be ensured and protected by law, and supported by cultural norms.

  • avatar image
    Jasmyne Bush November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Burkina Faso
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Delegate: Jasmyne Bush
    School: Williamston High School

    Reproductive health refers to diseases, disorders, and conditions that affect the functioning of the male and female reproductive systems during all stages of life. In many parts of the world, women lack control of their reproductive rights. These lack of rights are results of economic barriers, the absence of education about family planning methods, religious and cultural restrictions, and limits on access to various forms of birth control. The dangers these women could potentially obtain from not knowing about their reproductive health is uncanny. If women don’t, the unknown could extend into other parts of their lives as well. Young girls now are being the victims of things such as: child marriage and female genital mutilation, pregnancies that are dangerous to inadequate prenatal care, and death as a result of certain pregnancy complications. These certain things are a real risk that many of these women are currently facing. HIV/AIDS are sexually transmitted diseases that these women have an increasing chance of contracting. At this day in age, women constitute more than half of all people worldwide living with HIV. Women with these certain diseases, additionally, have an increased risk of transmitting them to their children.
    Burkina Faso is experiencing a rapid population growth which is pushing its capacity to complete its demographic and to harness its economic potential. At the center of this population growth is its reproductive health. The 2010 the Demographic and Health Survey indicated the following: 6% of women have a high total fertility rate, 11% have a high adolescent birth rate, and 15% have a low contraceptive prevalence rate. This is further compounded by poor child survival rates with only one in five children reaching the age of five, and by poor maternal outcomes, with only 17% of pregnant women completing 4 antenatal care visits.Maternal mortality and morbidity rates in Burkina Faso are among the highest in the world. A Burkinabe woman dies from pregnancy-related complications every three hours, and for each maternal death that occurs, 20 to 30 women suffer from pregnancy-related disabilities. Approximately 29% of Burkinabe women have an unmet need for modern contraception, and maternal and newborn health programs remain severely underfunded in Burkina Faso.
    In order to solve this epidemic measures need to be taken. Although there have been things done to help, none of them have been that effective. What should be done is that Burkina Faso should strengthen health centers and the health of the community health workers so more people have the opportunity to get access to receive the information of their reproductive health. In addition, training the health workers to deliver services, engaging the community members with significant influence, and making sure women have the rights to look after themselves in order for them to be healthy are all easy goals that can be achieved and should be done. Although these are small steps to decrease this growing quandary. Family planning programs need to be strengthened so that all women can more easily plan the timing and spacing of their pregnancies. This will reduce levels of unintended pregnancy, and thereby the need for abortion. At the same time, improving access to high-quality postabortion care services, especially in rural areas, is critically needed to reduce maternal illness and death in Burkina Faso.

  • Jazzywazzy1023
    Jazzywazzy1023 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Burkina Faso
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Delegate: Jasmyne Bush
    School: Williamston High School

    Reproductive health refers to diseases, disorders, and conditions that affect the functioning of the male and female reproductive systems during all stages of life. In many parts of the world, women lack control of their reproductive rights. These lack of rights are results of economic barriers, the absence of education about family planning methods, religious and cultural restrictions, and limits on access to various forms of birth control. The dangers these women could potentially obtain from not knowing about their reproductive health is uncanny. If women don’t, the unknown could extend into other parts of their lives as well. Young girls now are being the victims of things such as: child marriage and female genital mutilation, pregnancies that are dangerous to inadequate prenatal care, and death as a result of certain pregnancy complications. These certain things are a real risk that many of these women are currently facing. HIV/AIDS are sexually transmitted diseases that these women have an increasing chance of contracting. At this day in age, women constitute more than half of all people worldwide living with HIV. Women with these certain diseases, additionally, have an increased risk of transmitting them to their children.
    Burkina Faso is experiencing a rapid population growth which is pushing its capacity to complete its demographic and to harness its economic potential. At the center of this population growth is its reproductive health. The 2010 the Demographic and Health Survey indicated the following: 6% of women have a high total fertility rate, 11% have a high adolescent birth rate, and 15% have a low contraceptive prevalence rate. This is further compounded by poor child survival rates with only one in five children reaching the age of five, and by poor maternal outcomes, with only 17% of pregnant women completing 4 antenatal care visits.Maternal mortality and morbidity rates in Burkina Faso are among the highest in the world. A Burkinabe woman dies from pregnancy-related complications every three hours, and for each maternal death that occurs, 20 to 30 women suffer from pregnancy-related disabilities. Approximately 29% of Burkinabe women have an unmet need for modern contraception, and maternal and newborn health programs remain severely underfunded in Burkina Faso.
    In order to solve this epidemic measures need to be taken. Although there have been things done to help, none of them have been that effective. What should be done is that Burkina Faso should strengthen health centers and the health of the community health workers so more people have the opportunity to get access to receive the information of their reproductive health. In addition, training the health workers to deliver services, engaging the community members with significant influence, and making sure women have the rights to look after themselves in order for them to be healthy are all easy goals that can be achieved and should be done. Although these are small steps to decrease this growing quandary. Family planning programs need to be strengthened so that all women can more easily plan the timing and spacing of their pregnancies. This will reduce levels of unintended pregnancy, and thereby the need for abortion. At the same time, improving access to high-quality postabortion care services, especially in rural areas, is critically needed to reduce maternal illness and death in Burkina Faso.

  • Kat.Mooney
    Kat.Mooney November 15, 2017 Reply

    After a five year civil war, Tajikistan was left with a complicated ineffective health care system. Not only do our women and children lack the basic health needs but many of our citizens live in poverty without access to the basic health care. The Tajikistan government knows that health care is a critical issue and can’t be ignored however we do not have the support to rebuild our own health care system. If this committee is to enforce regulations on the healthcare available to women then our nation will not be able to reach these standards and will fall under unfair punishments. To improve these situations of woman’s health we must first improve other areas of our country.
    The primary cause of these issues in Tajikistan is the poverty of our citizens. Our economy relies heavily on Russia. We realize no nation should place their economic situation on the shoulders other countries. If Tajikistan is able to improve national economic relations we will be able to improve our poverty rates. By doing this we will be able to assist our citizens out of the dirty conditions they are currently in. Once our citizens are living in better conditions the spread of disease will decrease and promote a healthier way of life in Tajikistan. Many deaths of mothers and children stem from giving birth in bad situations. Improving the nation’s economy and general health will help prevent these deaths.
    Once the economy of Tajikistan can thrive the nation can begin to rebuild its health care system. This system can help to improve the healthcare situation of all citizens in Tajikistan. This will provide more woman and children access to the care they need before and after birth. If the resolution is passed in this committee to enforce woman’s and children’s health there must be a time period to allow countries such as myself to rebuild and improve our health systems.

  • Deemsus
    Deemsus November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Italy
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Health
    School: East Grand Rapids High School
    Delegate: Suzy Deems
    Italy supports women and the choice of what they elect to do with their body. Italy has struggled with HIV/Aids but is making progressive strides to inform, care for and prevent it from increasing. In the early 1980s, there were over 120,000 cases of people testing positive for HIV. Every year in Italy 4,000 new infections are registered. From 1995 to today the number of registered cases of AIDS has fallen from 5,600 to 1,200. This is due to our antiretroviral drug therapy. The effectiveness of the drug therapy means that the 23,000 Italians diagnosed with HIV have better chances of not progressing to AIDS. For prevention, it is important for women to have access to condoms.
    The most recent Ministry of Health campaign has finally included the word condom in its main publicity. In the commercial, it states “Respect life, respect yourself and others, use a condom and don’t take risks in love” as its main counsel. Italy believes we have to advertise and show support to women and inform them on the healthy and safe ways to have sexual intercourse.
    The use of condoms and others contraceptives is important for women’s health and to regulate pregnancies. Italy also now allows abortion. This formerly patriarchal religious country now recognizes the fairness of allowing, encouraging and recognizing women’s health and well being.
    Finally, Italy is the first western country with an official “menstrual leave” policy for working women. This mandates companies to grant three days of paid leave each month to female employees who experience painful periods. Italy has female-friendly labor laws. In Italy five months of paid maternity leave is mandatory for both of employers and employees, meaning that companies much grant leave and women, with few exceptions cannot renounce it. During this period, a new mother receives 80 percent of her salary paid by the INPS, Italy’s version of social security. After the five months are up, the parents of both genders can choose to take an additional six months.
    Italy believes other countries should adopt its ways for they are successful. We also hope to collaborate with other countries to prevent, educate and help our citizens on reproductive health issues. Thus, Italy supports further legislation to increase reproductive health laws.

  • HeNNaH
    HeNNaH November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Country: Laos
    Topic: Reproductive Rights

    Laos is very progressive on the topic of women’s reproductive rights. Laos is in what’s called a transition period and is in a period of rapid growth. Contraceptives like birth control is a legal over-the-counter drug and the “morning after pill” can be sold without prescriptions. Other feminine products are available purchase in everyday markets. However, the problem remains in its more rural community with only a very small portion of its road is paved trouble accessing those areas to enforce law becomes difficult. The problem starting with education, many village girls typically can expect up to primary school education. Soon after they can expect to be married and expecting children. The normal range of girls to give birth is from ages 15-19. They also have an increased infant mortality rate. Out of 1000 babies, 76 are expected die within their first month of life. Although not common, women have an increased risk for STI’s and HIV. Some women in these communities seek illegal abortions. An illegal abortion is an abortion performed in a clinic that is uncertified or is below standard to treat anyone. A girl may receive a legal abortion only if her life is danger until the new legislation that will lift restrictions in 2018 is passed lifting those restrictions. That does not solve the issue just yet there is other laws in place that conflict with laws in place. Laos believes the effective solution is to allow contraception and abortion. Every country in favor of human rights should fix their systems to accommodate for the modern issue. In addition education is the most important, when women feel their only goal is to get married and have children they will go toward contraception. Centers are starting to pop-up funded by Non Governmental Organizations including UNICEF, and the Asia Foundations. These centers provide the basic necessities for women from a variety of abusive backgrounds helping them look to ward a better future. Laos has restricted NGO’s in the past but it believes they can still help in it’s future development.

  • RainTarango
    RainTarango November 15, 2017 Reply

    UN Women
    Reproductive Health
    Honduras
    Rain Tarango

    In many areas of the world women lack control of reproductive rights. The main influential factors that contribute to this lack of control are because of economic reasons and absence of education. In Honduras this is especially critical due to the fact that 80% of the people live in poverty- the majority of which are women. Additionally, although many girls attend primary school, less than half continue to secondary school. The gap in education and wealth place women in a vulnerable position where they often lack control of marriage and pregnancies and develop an increased risk of HIV/AIDS which is the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age (15-44) in the world. The risk of death of young women and girls from AIDS (which can also be passed down from mother to offspring) and from unsafe abortion methods, puts 11% of the total female population in Honduras age 15-19 at risk. It is critical to start developing greater control of reproductive rights, through contraceptives and education to the younger generations to decrease the deaths of young women and girls.

    Although Honduras does condone the use of contraceptives and has been developing strategies to provide access to more married and unmarried women Honduras does not acknowledge abortions. Since 1997 a complete ban on abortions was put into place including those to save a mother’s life. As a result, some women and girls often seek unsafe ways to terminate pregnancies that often result in a serious decline in health or even death. Nearly ½ of recent births were to unplanned women younger than 20. Additionally, Honduras has participated in “Preventing through Education” to stop HIV in Latin America and the Caribbean by promoting prevention as a main strategy to combat HIV and AIDS. By integrating both the Ministries of Health and Ministries of Education Honduras aims to ensure comprehensive sex education and stress the importance of reproductive health. Due to some of these efforts access to contraception increased from 50% in 1998 to 61.8% in 2001. Honduras is slowly working to increase education and access to contraceptives in order to reduce mortality rates and the spread of HIV/AIDS while condemning abortions.

    Honduras recognizes the importance of family and understands the concepts related to reproductive health and rights. Efforts have been made to increase education especially to younger generations about HIV/AIDS which not only is a dominant topic of discussion in Honduras but in many other countries as well. However, Honduras recognizes that life is a right, even in an unborn child. Thus, abortion should never be an option and as such urges for other methods to prevent HIV/AIDS and unwanted pregnancies.

  • Evancalderon
    Evancalderon November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive health
    Country: Argentine Republic
    Delegate: Evan Calderon, FH Northern HS

    Reproductive health has been an emerging topic since landmark decisions such as Roe v. Wade in The United States of America or other reproductive health decisions. The topics of contraceptives, abortion and STD control have been a more prominent topic than ever. This topic is clearly important now as ever, especially when deciding how to handle the issues of abortion and government funded contraceptives.
    The Argentine Republic (thereafter Argentina) is affected by this topic, as are most other countries. In 2014, along with Denmark, Ethiopia and Morocco, Argentina helped raise awareness of the lack of contraceptives and Argentina currently has a law requiring the government to provide free contraceptives to women. On abortion, Argentina has recently made a historic decision to decriminalize all cases of abortion caused by rape.
    Argentina firmly believes that the use of contraceptives should be a human right to help prevent unwanted pregnancies and prevent the spread of STDs such as HIV and AIDS and believes that the government of the nation should provide free contraceptives. They also believe that if a pregnancy is caused by rape or may affect the health of the women bearing the fetus, the pregnancy can be terminated but in all other cases, abortion should not be provided. Some solutions to this issue of reproductive health is to urge governments to have government funded contraceptives and to allow abortions in rape cases and where the pregnancy is harmful to the mother.
    Reproductive health is an important issue concerning women and is especially important in today’s world. It is crucial that we make the right decisions concerning the health of half the population. It should be taken upon nations governments to make provide the necessary resources to keep the women of the world healthy.

  • Elwine39
    Elwine39 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Topic: Reproductive Health
    Country: Spain
    Represented by: The Roeper School
    Submitted by: Emma Wine

    Hello fellow delegates, Spain looks forward to working in cooperation with you all. Spain is committed to increasing the reproductive health of women. Spain’s signature on the Strategic Partnership Agreement in 2015 demonstrated its alignment with the UN’s Goal 5 and its commitment to prevent domestic violence, child marriage, and genital mutilation.
    In 2015, Spain raised the age of consent from 13 to 16 years old and months later, raised the minimum age for marriage from 14 to 16. Currently, abortions are legal in Spain without any restrictions in terms of reason. In 2014, the Spanish government did not go through with legislation that would have enacted restrictions, though the topic still remains highly controversial. Spain is proud to say our maternal mortality rate is low at 6 deaths per 100,000 live births. We also have a significant physician density of 3.82 physicians per 1,000 people. Spain’s historic link to the Americas leads us to note that while the United States GDP is significantly higher than that of Cuba, 100% of Cubans is able to have at least 4 prenatal care visits while only 97% of the United States is. Spain believes this proves GDP does not necessarily have to inhibit access to quality reproductive healthcare. We believe there are two aspects this committee must look at when considering this issue. The first is medical access and second is policy. We hope that by assessing both of these factors globally, we will be able to work cooperatively to pass resolutions to improve the overall state of reproductive health.

  • Taylor.foster
    Taylor.foster November 15, 2017 Reply

    UN WOMEN

    REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

    GREECE

    Sexual and reproductive health problems are responsible for one third of health issues for women between 15 and 44 years old. There are many diseases people can get from having bad reproductive health. Women in third world countries suffer a lot too due to rape and lack of supplies such as birth control and condoms. Greece has one of the highest abortion rates in Europe and sex education is still not included in the schools curriculum which can be harmful because then people will not be educated on sex leading to unwanted pregnancy explaining the high amount of abortions. But also Greece has a very low fertility rate.

    Public sectors have been required to provide family planning services since 1980 but only 2% of women were accessing these services in 1990. There was a legislation abortion in 1986 but it clearly did not work because today we still have a very abortion rate. Greece also has a very low fertility rate which in 1980 was 2.21 and in the 90’s dropped to 1.29. The UN researches fertility in 30 countries, one being Greece, and found that men and women wanted to have two children but ended up having only one or non at all because of financial which was probably caused by Greece’s lack of a good economy.

    Greece hopes to further education on reproductive health in schools so that we are able to lower the abortion rates in our country. We also hope to make it more available for third world countries to get abortions and supplies such as condoms and birth control to lower the number of women with sexually transmitted diseases and to lower the number of birth related deaths.

  • Cmjohnson917
    Cmjohnson917 November 16, 2017 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Reproductive Rights
    Country: Algeria
    Women’s security with their own reproductive rights has increased significantly in Algeria in the past four decades. In 1980, the country of Algeria didn’t have widespread methods for birth control. Fortunately, The United Nations started an eight million dollar program to strengthen women’s reproductive rights. This action created greater access to birth control and sexual education. Algeria believes that strengthening women’s reproductive rights can secure a safer and better country as a whole. The country of Algeria believes that women need consistent rights for their reproductive health.
    Algeria’s United Nations representative, Sabri boukadoum, spoke with the United Nations and concluded that women’s rights were a very high priority for the country of Algeria. Algeria is primarily Islamic of religious nature, and therefore encourages family planning. The Quran does not restrict family planning or birth control. Married women are given free birth control from many medical facilities. Women do not need consent from their husbands or parents to acquire birth control. Algeria believes that family planning positively affects economic stability and physical health. The Quran is interpreted in such a way that we believe that women have rights to sexual pleasure and rights. The country of Algeria offers a large range of Contraceptives, such as IUDs, pills, condoms, and some male sterilization.
    While Algeria permits contraception, abortion is strictly prohibited. A medical professional or no-professional who performs an abortion is subject from six months to two years in prison. Prior to 1998, the only exceptions to restricted abortion is when the pregnancy threatens the life and safety of the mother, but now, it also includes if she’s been raped by Islamic rebels. Minors cannot receive abortions under any circumstances. The country of Algeria hopes to increase its progress with women’s reproductive rights as it will help our country develop fully, but keep abortion restrictions due to abortion being an immoral practice.

  • PatrickGleaton
    PatrickGleaton November 16, 2017 Reply

    Topic: Reproductive health
    Country:UAE
    Represented by: Kalamazoo Central
    Submitted by: Patrick Gleaton

    The UAE has a set of rules concerning reproductive health and abortion. We believe that it is a crime for a women to have an abortion. There are two exceptions to this rule. One is that the woman may abort the fetus if the pregnancy endangered the mother. The second is that if the baby will be deformed you may abort it. All of these must be done within 120 days of the fetus being implanted. We believe that abortion is unholy and sinful. Many of our citizens are uneducated and do not understand what HIV is and how it can spread. We look forward to working with other nations to help prevent abortions from being needed and to eliminate HIV.

  • Brookeblackwell
    Brookeblackwell November 16, 2017 Reply

    Submitted to: UN Women
    From: Chad
    Topic: Reproductive Health

    As a country where roughly 47% of the nation’s population is below the poverty line, it is more difficult for a nation such as Chad to improve women’s reproductive rights when barriers for better and healthier reproduction have existed for centuries. However, it is Chad’s mission to improve and stress the importance of reproductive rights for women.
    It is the duty of every nation’s government to engage policy makers to promote progressive ideas (while keeping culture and traditions in account) and eliminate proposals that are harmful or discriminatory to women’s health. An important question for all nations to consider is, “How can our government allocate more funds into funding for reproductive health care at no expense of the taxpayer?” On the more cultural side of things, “How do nations respect cultural traditions when creating legislature concerning women’s health?’
    One of the more simple ways to promote women’s health is through education. Making it an educational requirement to provide some sort of sexual education can be extremely beneficial. Educating even one person on healthy and safe reproduction can create a ripple effect, allowing this person to pass their knowledge onto others.
    The UN has been extremely helpful in helping smaller nations that have less money developing programs to help protect and improve women’s reproductive rights. Chad gladly would accept any such help as long as the larger more powerful nations funding these programs are willing to discuss what works for Chad as a smaller less wealthy nation.
    A good resolution should set guidelines for what is acceptable reproductive based health care, what inalienable rights women should have universally, and how we can decrease the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, especially in more impoverished nations. Reproductive rights for women will take a global effort.

  • MFS1228
    MFS1228 November 16, 2017 Reply

    United Nation Women
    Reproductive Health
    Turkey
    Monica Stasiulewicz
    Health reproduction has been an evident issue, for sometime now, in nations around the world. Many of these nations are taking steps to provide more accessible reproductive options for women, for example the U.S. has implemented an experiment in St. Louis, offering women free birth control, which led to a dramatic decrease of abortion and teen births. About fifty-nine other countries have over the counter emergency contraceptives available for women. Contraceptives have helped women stay active in the work force, recovering from a previous pregnancy and reduce unintended pregnancies and abortions. Access to health reproduction gives women the opportunity to stay active in their communities and further themselves in society.

    According to Turkey, health reproduction is an important issue that has been looked at. Turkey has offered NorLevo, an over the counter contraceptive, costing only 16 lira or $4.14 in U.S. dollars. In 1983 Turkey made it legal for women to have an abortion, only if in the first trimester, whereas other countries legalize an abortion to save the mother’s life or protect her health. With this law implemented maternal deaths have reduced drastically. Turkey and Tunisia are the only countries in the middle east to have legalized abortion. There are many hospitals in Turkey that have specialized gynecologists, that offer procedures for reproductive health, such as gynecologists exams, hysterectomies, and more to help tend to women’s reproductive health, as well as pregnant women.

    Turkey has made strides in reproductive health, considering they are one of few middle eastern countries, that have legalized abortion. However much turmoil has occurred in Turkey, and in order to help those in their country they must first address internal issues, such as restoring power to the government, after the coup that occurred last year, in order to improve Turkey, socially and politically, so that they may develop their community and the world.

    https://www.unfpa.org/sites/default/files/admin-resource/TurkeyCPE_Report.pdf

    Ap. “Study: Free Birth Control Leads to Way Fewer Abortions.” CBS News, CBS Interactive, 5 Oct. 2012, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/study-free-birth-control-leads-to-way-fewer-abortions/.

    Cavallo, Shena. “Access to Abortion in Turkey: No Laughing Matter.” International Women’s Health Coalition, 17 Feb. 2015, iwhc.org/2015/02/access-abortion-turkey-no-laughing-matter/.                         
    “Women’s Health Care Physicians.” Access to Contraception – ACOG, http://www.acog.org/Resources-And-Publications/Committee-Opinions/Committee-on-Health-Care-for-Underserved-Women/Access-to-Contraception.

    http://www.globalcomputronics.com/2016/03/09/turkey-reproductive-health-officer-national-position/

  • Donniecrossley
    Donniecrossley November 16, 2017 Reply

    UN Women
    Reproductive Health
    Afghanistan
    Donald Wayne Crossley Jr

    Afghanistan recognizes the importance of reproductive rights to women all over the globe. The country also recognizes that many countries in the world are concerned that not enough actions are being made to ensure that women are receiving the reproductive rights they deserve. After all, it is their own bodies. In late 2003, the United States Congress passed the “Partial-Birth Abortion Act” which was the first federal ban on abortions. This angered many individuals who believed it is the woman’s choice whether or not to abort their child. Afghanistan would be more than welcome to propose a compromise so all nations can receive what they desire at least to some aspect.

    Reproductive rights in Afghanistan is a sensitive topic. In modern Afghanistan, 25% of children die before their fifth birthday and 50 women die daily due to pregnancy complications. When the Taliban took over the capital of Afghanistan, Kabul, in 1996, most reproductive rights were eliminated. Since that siege, the country has slowly been rebuilding its morality toward women, but forced marriages, lack of female education, violence, and high mortality rates of pregnant women still exist. In 2004, a new constitution was reinstated that included male and female Afghanis were equal before the law. Women’s rights are gradually growing which is a miracle considering the Taliban and Al-Qaeda still run a majority of the country. Afghanistan would love nothing more than to be applauded for its growth in morality and common sense, but there are still some citizens who are undeniably against the giving of reproductive rights to women. Afghanistan would like to compromise on a level that the majority of the members of the United Nations would accept.

    The Afghani government would like to negotiate a solution that will cause the least amount of altercations as possible. Though many Afghan citizens are pro-abortion, Afghanistan also has to consider Muslim values and the majority of Afghans who believe abortion is morally wrong and unjust. Afghanistan recommends that abortion should be legal but only under extreme circumstances. These circumstances could involve nonconsensual sexual intercourse or if the fetus endangers the mother’s life. These are mere examples, but the members of the United Nations are welcome to cooperate with Afghanistan on a compromise, but a complete ban of abortion or a unmoderated sanction of abortion should not be tolerated.

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