The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association

International Intellectual Property Protection

International Intellectual Property Protection

Creative works, such as medicines, trademarks, and art, are vital to a thriving modern economy. To bolster their economies, governments often provide protections for intellectual property (IP), which rewards creators or owners of creative works for producing these works. The Paris and Berne Conventions of the late 19th century form the foundation for international IP protection in the 21st century. The Berne Convention established an international organization that oversees international treaties governing IP protection. This organization, now known as the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), became a specialized agency of the United Nations in 1974. In 1995, all members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) signed the TRIPS Agreement, the most comprehensive treaty to provide strong protections for IP rights. The TRIPS Agreement attempts to set a fair playing field for companies operating across national borders, and parties allegedly in breach of the agreement must go before the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body. The WIPO Copyright Treaty, which took effect in 2002, extends IP protections to digital works and forbids circumventing Digital Rights Management (DRM) systems. The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) attempts to go further, seeking to harmonize IP rights enforcement standards. Although signed in 2011, ACTA has not gone into effect, in part because protests alleged ACTA would stymy free speech, undermine internet users’ privacy, and limit access to generic medicines. More recent multilateral treaties, such as TPP and TTIP, have advanced provisions similar to those in ACTA.

 

Emerging technologies and the political discourse surrounding IP continually challenge the current approach to IP protection. Although the U.S. Supreme Court decided naturally-occurring genetic sequences are not patentable in the US, the court’s ruling allows DNA manipulated in a lab to be patented. Similar, often less-restrictive rulings have appeared in other jurisdictions, such as Australia, Canada, Europe, and Japan, and no treaty currently governs IP protection for artificial genes. Meanwhile, movements to democratize information argue against restricting access to creative works, such as when digital libraries use paywalls. Some open access proponents contend strong IP protections effectively allow only well-established actors in commerce and academia to use creative works, preventing other actors from discovering innovative uses for them. In addition, recent lawsuits, such as those between Samsung and Apple Inc., portend a future wherein businesses disingenuously use IP protections to reduce competing firms’ market share. Lastly, many businesses based in developed countries have decried the use of their creative works without proper licensing in developing countries. For instance, developing countries have occasionally allowed domestic firms to produce and sell more affordable, albeit unlicensed generic drugs. Many large U.S.-based technology companies have increasingly accused the People’s Republic of China of allowing domestic firms to steal foreign IP.

 

This body must determine the most appropriate way to protect IP going forward. Possible approaches include pursuing comprehensive treaties that harmonize IP rights enforcement standards or narrower treaties that address certain types of IP. Alternatively, this body may consider focusing on more strictly enforcing existing IP protections, settling on the status quo, or loosening existing IP protections.

  • Vipuladu
    Vipuladu November 10, 2017 Reply

    Legal Committee
    Re Evaluating The Chemical Weapons Convention
    United States Of America
    Nagasai Vipul Adusumilli

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) is an arms control treaty that outlaws the production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons and their precursors. It is administered by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) which is an organization based in The Hague, Netherlands. The treaty entered into effect in 1997. The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the use, development, production, stockpiling and transfer of chemical weapons. Any chemical used for warfare is considered a chemical weapon by the Convention. Some chemicals such as Chlorine are deemed safe under the CWC but using it as a weapon is illegal. The CWC allows stockpiling incapacitating chemical agents (ICAs) like chlorine. Due to recent developments in chemistry, biological and chemical weapons have been perceived as the same thing. The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC) does not require states to verify if they have destroyed the compounds, meaning states secretly have biological weapons. Biological and Chemical weapons can not be manufactured but places such as Syria still make them. These weapons should have been destroyed in 2012 as Syria claimed but have not.

    The United States of America believes Chemical and Biological Weapons must be banned for warfare from all countries. We are going to destroy ours by 2023 and already have destroyed nearly 90% of all our chemical weapons. We have signed and ratified both the CWC and the BWC. We believe they can be used only for industrial, agricultural, research, medical, pharmaceutical reasons as stated in the CWC. We believe merging the BWC with CWC, as suggested by some policymakers, will be a commendable idea because it would further enforce the banning of Biological Weapons to states that have not signed the BWC. We have attacked Syria to destroy their Chemical weapons because Syria has been using Chemical Weapons such as Sarin on its’ people. Syria has signed and ratified the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the Convention Against Torture. This means Syria cannot harm or torture their citizens with any weapons which they have done. We believe there should be consequences for these actions. Other countries such as South Sudan have signed the CWC but have not ratified it which alarms some states. We believe the definition of Chemical Weapons and Biological Weapons should be adjusted since new advancements in chemistry and biology have been made which help the greater good. Non-usable chemicals in the CWC are defined as “any toxic chemical or its precursor that can cause death, injury, temporary incapacitation or sensory irritation through its chemical action.” We believe Schedule 1 chemicals should be banned while Schedule 2 and Schedule 3 may exist only for scientific purposes and that we should limit the stockpile of these chemicals in countries based on their previous history with these weapons.

    We would like to see the UN impose sanctions on countries that have used these weapons and urge them to destroy biological and chemical weapons as soon as possible. We would like to see the UN merge the CWC and the BWC together in order for states to understand the severity of both weapons. We recommend other countries to help financially or with military power to destroy these weapons. We further hope to broaden the definition of chemical weapons.

  • Alex-Zvk
    Alex-Zvk November 14, 2017 Reply

    Legal: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Yemen
    Alex Vankuiken
    Yemen strongly affirms the sentiment of protecting intellectual property, especially so on an international level, but has concerns towards the issue of enforcement for nations which may be lacking resources. Yemen feels that many of the provisions in previous treaties are mostly sufficient, but fail to recognize that it is difficult in developing countries such as Yemen to enforce these standards effectively while maintaining economic growth. In addition, emerging technologies, primarily in biotech, are not sufficiently accounted for in current treaties and require some form of standardization between countries. Yemen feels it is important protect individual companies’ inventions in a way which does not stifle competition. Although Yemen agrees with the idea of protecting intellectual property, it feels that developing countries will be unable to protect these rights to a standard acceptable by developed countries, and advises that any resolution proposed has this issue in mind.
    Yemen is a member of the World Intellectual Property Organization, and has signed onto the Berne and Paris Conventions, as it firmly believes that protecting intellectual property has many economic benefits as it encourages innovation and trade between nations. It agrees with the idea of national treatment, understanding that intellectual property rights in a firm’s home country should be protected in other countries as well. In order to ensure that developing countries are able to enforce these laws, Yemen sees a need to include strategies and potentially funding if the need for enforcement is urgent for these countries in the resolution. It understands the need for companies to be able to protect their intellectual property rights abroad, and calls for greater coordination between nations in doing so. Although Yemen would like to prevent against biopiracy in a resolution, Yemen feels that appropriate patenting should be extended to biotechnology as well. Finally, Yemen affirms the right to free speech and would like to ensure that any resolution proposed does not suppress this right as well. Above all, Yemen believes that any resolution proposed should include ways to help enforce intellectual property laws in countries which lack resources to do so.

  • Ngrout
    Ngrout November 14, 2017 Reply

    Legal: International Intellectual Property Protection
    State of Japan
    Fishers High School
    Nicholas Grout
    We the people of the State of Japan (Japan) have great honor and great pride in our Intellectual Property (IP). One of the biggest threats to our IPs is the threat of cyber attack and cyber terrorism.
    In the early months of 2017, our country faced a great cyber attack on a multitude of different corporations. The base of these attacks were unknown, as were the those who committed these attacks. Of the companies that were affected the most by these attacks in one of our country’s biggest travel agencies named JTB Corporation. More than just the JTB Corporation being attacked, another 65 private companies were also target. As for the target of these attack? The information of those who use these companies..
    Often, the main target of the companies are those who use these companies. More specifically, the names of those people, their passport information and credit card information. After all of this personal information was leaked, the people of Japan have suffered greatly by having about 12.6 million cases of these leaks.
    The delegate of Japan would like to show what our country has been doing to prevent against these attacks happening. The Japanese Ministry of Defense (MoD) have been putting more and more resources into preventing these attacks. One of the main resources that the MoD has been fulfilling is increasing the amount of people in our Cyber Defence Unit (CDU).
    Originally, the CDU only had 90 soldier employed at the task of defending our nation against cyber attacks. The government of Japan wishes to increase these number by adding from 110 to 1000 soldiers to the CDU. More than just adding more soldiers, the government would also like to focus a group of these soldiers to study cyber warfare techniques.
    Since our nation is not allowed to have any type of protection beyond self defence, as a delegate, we stress that there is nothing offensive in our ways. We strictly only want o better our nation by having better self defences against these attacks.

    “12.6 Million Cases of Personal Information Leaked in Japan in 2016, Survey Shows.” The Japan Times, The Japan Times, 28 Feb. 2017, http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/02/28/national/crime-legal/12-6-million-personal-info-leak-cases-seen-japan-2016-card-info-targeted/#.WgpUuFtSxhE.
    Gady, Franz-Stefan. “Japan’s Defense Ministry Plans to Boost Number of Cyber Warriors.”The Diplomat, Tokyo Report, 17 July 2017, https://thediplomat.com/2017/07/japans-defense-ministry-plans-to-boost-number-of-cyber-warriors/.

  • Senpai152
    Senpai152 November 14, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    The Plurinational State of Belgium
    Brandon Pham

    The Paris and Berne Conventions of the late 19th century form the foundation for international IP protection in the 21st century. The Berne Convention established an international organization that oversees international treaties governing IP protection. In order to safeguard the creative works that are vital to thriving modern economies, governments often provide protection for intellectual property (IP) which rewards creators and owners of creative works for producing these works. The Plurinational State of Belgium believes this is an important topic because the credit for the creations, such as medicines, trademarks, and art, are under risk of being taken by hackers. The Bolivian Intellectual Property Service (SENAPI) has already passed several laws that protect the rights to intellectual property.

    Bolivia does not have an area of civil law specifically related to industrial property, but has a century-old industrial privileges law still in force. SENAPI is aware of Bolivia’s obligations under the TRIPS Agreement and it sets out the minimum standards of IPR protection in compliance with this agreement. The TRIPS agreement is the most comprehensive treaty to provide strong protections for IP rights. The TRIPS Agreement attempts to set a fair playing field for companies operating across national borders, and parties allegedly in breach of the agreement must be judged before the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body. SENAPI sustains its position that Bolivia complies with the substantive obligations of the main conventions of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property (Paris Convention), and the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (Berne Convention) in their most recent versions. Today, this is not a prevalent issue in Belgium, but we recognize the effects it could have on our country and our allies.

    Bolivian customs authorities continue to try to intercept counterfeit goods shipments at international borders, but the customs service lacks the human and financial resources needed to be effective. We ask of the UN to dedicate more time and resources to intercepting the counterfeit goods in order to prevent the exploitation of the economy. Rather than incorporating IPR engagement into its normal routine, Bolivian customs usually acts on these matters as a result of complaints filed by industries trying to protect their brands from counterfeit imports. Additionally, importers seem to be unaware that counterfeit products are illegal and that the payment of customs fees does not “legalize” the sale of pirated goods. Moreover, there is a sense of unregulated capitalism with regard to the sale of goods in the informal sector. The stability of every nation’s government is dependent on the ratification of an effective treaty that would limit the exploitation of the economy.

  • 17904
    17904 November 14, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Delegate: Abigail Zhang

    For an economy to grow, it is important that citizens continue to produce creative works. Works like domain names, building designs, and softwares are protected by intellectual property laws such as patent, trademark, and copyright law. Not only do intellectual property laws protect intellectual property (IP), they also protect the physical property that was a result of the idea. IP protection must continue to be enforced in the future. Enforcements in protecting IP rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) almost don’t exist, despite that they are legally protected. Before declaring independence in 1960, IP in the DRC was protected by Belgium.

    The DRC is a part of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a UN organization, and the World Trade Organization (WTO), and therefore is under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). The TRIPS Agreement is a legal international agreement signed by all member nations of the WTO. On September 23, 2013, the UN intellectual property agency urged that markets be more easily accessible, especially to developing countries. The WIPO has launched an IP policy and has trained IP officers in the DRC. These actions have increased the overall growth in the GDP of the DRC, but not extremely significantly.

    The DRC believes that stricter IP laws will harm the economy in the short-term, due to the country not being able to produce as much IP as developed countries. On the other hand, educating the DRC about IP protection and policies will help the expand the economy in the long-term. IP laws and regulations should be imposed depending on a country’s needs. As a developing and third world country, the DRC would like to see better enforcement of IP laws. Third world countries encourage looser IP protection because their economies are much less advanced, and also encourage laws giving developing countries time to reverse engineer IP that is unpatentable. The DRC suggests that the UN imposes sanctions on countries that steal foreign IP, as well as working towards treaties regarding more specific IP.

  • 20HerezaMo
    20HerezaMo November 14, 2017 Reply

    Country: Senegal
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Delegate: Molly Hereza
    School: Williamston High School

    To help boost their economies many governments provide protection for intellectual property, which rewards the creators for their work. The Berne Convention helped to establish and international organization relating to IP protection.This organization became known as the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), which became a specialized agency in the United Nations. All members of the World Trade Organization signed the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement in 1995, which provides strong protections for IP rights. This sets a fair playing field for companies operating internationally. This also will help keep others from stealing Intellectual Property and saying it is their own.

    Senegal is a member of WIPO, the African Intellectual Property Organization, and is a member of the TRIPS Agreement. Senegal follows the Data Protection Act and will not allow the international distribution of data without letting the country know about the transfer or distribution. They have been focusing on having customs screen things from certain countries such as China, Nigeria, and Dubai and other centers of illegal production. They have had some success with confiscating counterfeit goods, however the enforcement of IP rights is weak because the goods tend to reappear on the market. They have been trying to warn people about what counterfeiting goods could do to the economy. They have also been having officers train with manufacturers to identify counterfeited goods.

    Senegal is invested in the protection of Intellectual Properties so that their economy may improve further. They also wish to see other countries benefit from the protection of Intellectual Properties. As of now they will follow the agreements and organizations relating to IP protection. What they wish to see happen will be countries more strictly enforcing the law so that the distribution of IP does not make it to their country. They would like to stop the illegal distribution of these goods quickly and efficiently. They will agree with any country who is ready and willing to help improve the protections of Intellectual Properties. They also hope that countries who are centers of the illegal distribution of Intellectual Property will also be willing to help stop the illegal distribution.

  • Matthewwedeven
    Matthewwedeven November 14, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Iceland
    Matthew Brian Wedeven

    Intellectual property protection consists of the protection of inventions and current running tests for new prototypes for inventors and scientists alike. As technology revolutionizes, the need for the protection of one’s ideas rise. People release products revolutionizing technology, but when a company is able to use the product freely in their own products, the big business will override the original inventor. Because of this, the expansion of IP protection is necessary as technology continues to develop. In 2005, Iceland signed the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT). Iceland’s desire is to continue to protect its inventors inventions through patents. The PCT is a treaty that establishes a system to protect inventions in forms of patents and requires big businesses to form contracts with the inventor to prevent the stealing of ideas from occurring. A major issue that has spread due to technology is the pirating of movies, TV shows, and video games. It is nearly impossible to control with the old IP protection laws which requires a new set of laws to be instituted to combat this issue. Property rights are also recognized and protected in the Constitution of Iceland.

    The topic if IP protection in Iceland is growing due to the expansion of technology. Games, movies, TV shows, and many more electronical items are being pirated and sold illegally. Recently, there has been a crackdown on the piration of these products, however, it is still a prominent occurrence in Iceland. To address this problem, Iceland has became a member of The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement and the World Intellectual Property Organization partying with most of their agreements, ultimately increasing the regulation of the piration of the producer’s ideas. Iceland has passed over 30 laws and treaties over the past 40 years revolving around IP protection calling for the stop of counterfeit and stolen ideas. Also Iceland has developed a policy which requires strict citizenship to own or use real property in Iceland. Fishing, hunting and property rights are restricted unless the strict citizenship requirements are meet.

    The progression of IP protection has risen immensely, however, there is more to be done to improve regulations. Pirates and counterfeiters are still prevalent in society resulting in the need for the UN to step in. Iceland proposes that citizens caught in the act, will receive longer jail sentences, large fines paid to the original inventor, as well as the destruction of all the counterfeit or stolen products. This will eliminate these items from circulation that are stealing money from the inventors. In correlation with that, Iceland proposes that the patents life span to increase giving the inventor time to produce his products, and the cost to decline influencing inventors to protect their ideas and reduce their risk of them leaking into the public.

  • Vipuladu
    Vipuladu November 14, 2017 Reply

    Legal Committee
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    United States of America
    Nagasai Vipul Adusumilli

    Intellectual property (IP) protection is a very important aspect of society. It protects people’s and state’s right to create new ideas and inventions and reap the benefits of them. States such as the People’s Republic of China have been accused of stealing IP’s from foreign nations. Intellectual-property theft covers a wide spectrum such as counterfeiting fashion designs, pirating movies and videogames, patent infringement and stealing proprietary technology and software. The Paris and Berne convention set a foundation for IP laws. The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) assists applicants in seeking patent protection internationally for their inventions, helps patent offices with their patent granting decisions, and facilitates public access to a wealth of technical information relating to those inventions. Countries now more than ever have been stealing IP without consequences.

    The United States of America has altogether lost costs up to $600 billion a year in IP theft. China accounts for most of that loss. This assault hurts economic growth, costs Americans jobs, weakens our military capability. The United States Trade Representative (USTR) has made a list of countries who have IP problems. On our priority watch list we have China, Indonesia, Thailand, India, Alegria, Kuwait, Russia, Ukraine, Argentina, and Chile. Our watch list includes Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Colombia and many more countries. For example Chinese companies have stolen trade secrets from virtually every sector of the our economy such as automobiles, auto tires, aviation, chemicals, consumer electronics, electronic trading, industrial software, biotech and pharmaceuticals. Last year U.S. Steel accused Chinese hackers of stealing trade secrets related to the production of lightweight steel, then turning them over to Chinese steel makers. China has targeted the American defense industrial base. Chinese spies have gone after private defense contractors and subcontractors, national laboratories, public research universities, think tanks and the our government itself. Chinese agents have gone after the United States’ most significant weapons, such as the F-35 Lightning, the Aegis Combat System and the Patriot missile system. They also illegally exported unmanned underwater vehicles and thermal-imaging cameras,and stole documents related to the B-52 bomber, the Delta IV rocket, the F-15 fighter and even the Space Shuttle. Chinese government support for intellectual-property theft could trigger retaliatory action by our government, based on the Economic Espionage Act, Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act and the National Defense Authorization Act. Countries such as Venezuela have signed the Paris convention but not have signed the PCT. We encourage all countries to sign the PCT.

    We would like to see the UN strictly enforce IP protection. We strongly recommend states to also enforce the IP laws themselves in their own states. We encourage states to sign the PCT in order to help their economies.

  • Janerob
    Janerob November 14, 2017 Reply

    Robert Janes
    Italy
    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection

    Intellectual Property protection ensures peoples rights to create with no fear of other people claiming their creations, however it should only cover invention, not medical treatments or computer programs. The Italian Republic believes in protecting inventions that have a use in an industrial application, whether it be locally or globally. As Italy is a member of the Patents Co-Operation Treaty (PCT), strong international protection is a topic that must be addressed. For countries such as The United States of America, IP theft takes about 600 billion dollars a year. Most of this IP Theft comes from China, and The Italian Republic would like to see stricter guidelines put in to place to prevent more theft.
    Italy would like to see the UN push for stronger international IP Protection. However, The Italian Republic does not believe that medical procedures and treatment of the human body should be allowed to be protected by IP laws. When protecting these, the fear of monopolizing a life saving treatment is a large one. Making sure no one company can overprice a ground breaking treatment for the purpose of economical gain over the wellbeing of a nation is top priority. Italy would like for every person to be able to receive treatment if needed, and when a treatment is condensed to a single doctor or medical group, it makes this extremely hard. The Italian Republic believes this should apply to mental health as well. Doing this puts the well being of the people ahead of any potential economic gain made by corporations whose sole purpose of creating a treatment is economical gain.
    The Italian Republic would like to see the UN regulate IP Protections to prevent medical treatments to being monopolized. We would also like to see the UN ensure international protection on IP protection. The PCT is a great place to start, and Italy urges countries to sign it to protect their peoples inventions.

  • Musicsong01
    Musicsong01 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Ms. Jordan Bick
    Fishers High School
    Syrian Arab Republic
    LEGAL- International Intellectual Property Protection

    The Syrian Arab Republic has taken great measures to protect the rights of Intellectual Property rights and their owners. Intellectual Property refers to creations of the mind, inventions, literary and artistic works and symbols, and names and images used in commerce. Intellectual Property is divided into two categories: Industrial Property including patents for inventions, trademarks, industrial designs and geographic indications and Copyright covering literary works, films, music, artistic works, and architectural design. Intellectual Property Rights foster a competitive marketplace by encouraging disclosure of innovation through protecting the fruits of that innovation for a period of time. Intellectual Property Rights are regional in nature and the conditions of their grant and enforceability are governed by the laws of each jurisdiction. The legal system recognizes and facilitates the transfer of property rights, including the rights of intellectual property (IP). Syria is one of the member countries of the Paris Convention, of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) since May 2004, and has established the Syrian Association for the intellectual property in 2005. However, in 2014, the European Union and the United States of America both placed sanctions on the Republic, as well as the Islamic Republic of Iran, and sanctioned some of Syria’s IP protection rights, as well as the rights of Syrian residents. Restrictions include prohibiting economic activity with certain designated persons. It is the responsibility of the business owner to check individuals and companies on the restricted list. Funds could be frozen and economic resources withdrawn, even if the designated persons are dealt with indirectly through a third party. Another restriction is the export of key oil and gas shipping equipment and technology, insurance, banking and finance. Businesses must identify precisely what activity is being carried out in relation to Syria to ensure that the activity is not prohibited. U.S persons, entities, and their foreign branches are prohibited from activities relevant to trading and doing general business with Syrian persons. Failure to comply with the sanctions will result in penalties, such as civil and criminal fines and imprisonment. These sanctions present many issues for potential investors and owners of businesses. These individuals would like to increase their markets, but have to go through several obstacles to do so, and there are multiple harsh punishments, the most so being imprisonment, when individuals breach these regulations. People are forced to consider the potential impacts of these and monitor the sanctions regime, with the political situation of the region in mind. With the economic limitations, thousands of Syrian citizens are refugees in Europe trying to escape the conflict that has now become a civil war. Then, there is the matter of cybercrime. Though Syria is not incredibly open about putting their licenses in cyberspace, it is still possible for hackers to get a hold of confidential information and manipulate it. The internet is much harder to control than people, and Syria has already issued a ban on most social media sites including but not limited to Facebook and Twitter.

    With this brief history in mind, the delegation of Syria would like to continue to support and protect the IP rights of individuals all around the world. Though it is difficult with the amount of technology and resources that can be used to manipulate products and their protection, Syria feels that it is possible to protect international IP further. Developed countries have established laws and consequences for privacy intrusion, but not all the countries Syria trades with have these investigations. Syria is pushing for international legislation against technology intrusion and requests that all countries they work with have this legislation and strict penalties. Syria is also against social media and journalism from inside the country, as it could spread heinous lies about the government and its efforts to improve the lives of its citizens.

    The delegation of Syria is open to all recommendations as to what the committee can accomplish to ensure the protection and safety of IP and its rights. What the Republic would like to see done is pursuing comprehensive treaties with other delegations to ensure the protection of every individual with IP rights. The Syrian Arab Republic would also like to see some of the aforementioned restrictions lifted so that businesses can obtain more freedom when trying to sell their product and expand their markets. Syria would also like to see stronger measures of protection from cyber criminals by means of prevention and punishment for those who attempt to breach top secret information.

    Sources include:
    “Syrian Arab Republic (12 Texts).” Syrian Arab Republic: IP Laws and Treaties, WIPO, 2017, http://www.wipo.int/wipolex/en/profile.jsp?code=SY#tools.
    Balloch, Harriet, et al. “Protecting IP Rights in Sanctioned Countries: Iran and Syria : Clyde & Co (En).” Clydeco.com, Clyde & Co, 6 Apr. 2015, http://www.clydeco.com/insight/article/protecting-ip-rights-in-sanctioned-countries-iran-and-syria.
    “Regulations and Customs in Syria: Intellectual Property.” Import Export Solutions, Societe Generale, June 2017, http://www.import-export.societegenerale.fr/en/find-your-market/country/syria/regulations-intellectual-property.
    “Message of the Ministry of Internal Trade and Consumer Protection on the Occasion of World Intellectual Property Day.” Syrian Patent Office (SPO), Syrian Arab Republic Ministry of Internal Trade and Consumer Protection Industrial & Commercial Protection Directorate, 2011, http://www.spo.gov.sy/en/.
    Goodman, S. E. “Read ‘Science and Technology to Counter Terrorism: Proceedings of an Indo-U.S. Workshop’ at NAP.edu.” National Academies Press: OpenBook, National Academy of Sciences, 2007, http://www.nap.edu/read/11848/chapter/6.
    Lorscheider, Lou. “US Hits Hundreds of Syrian Tech Workers with New Sanctions.” VOAnews.com, VOA, 24 Apr. 2017, http://www.voanews.com/a/us-announces-sanctions-on-syria/3823489.html.
    “31 CFR 542.520 – Certain Transactions Related to Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights, and Other Intellectual Property Authorized.” LII / Legal Information Institute, Cornell Law School, http://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/31/542.520.
    Alkhatib, Kinan. “The Cyber Security Environment in Syria: The Law Policies Perspective.” IGmena.org, IGmena, http://www.igmena.org/The-Cyber-Security-Environment-in-Syria-The-law-Policies-Perspective.
    “Intellectual Property Rights in the Cyberspace in the Syrian Legislation.” SlidePlayer.com, SlidePlayer.com Inc., 12 Dec. 2007, http://www.slideplayer.com/slide/9523371/.

  • Sethwoodbury
    Sethwoodbury November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Kingdom of Swaziland
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Delegate: Seth Woodbury
    School: Williamston High School

    International Intellectual Property Protection, established in the later 19th century during the Paris and Berne Conference, is an ever changing policy that must be updated to address modern creative works. In 1974, the World Intellectual Property Organization branch of the United Nations was established for this exact purpose. Working hand-in-hand with the World Trade Organization, the World Intellectual Property Organization regulates intangible property policies and monitors exchange to ensure these policies are obeyed. 2002 was the year when the Copyright Treaty was passed dramatically extending the role of the World Intellectual Property Organization into the digital world. World Intellectual Property Organization has since then continued to expand, but always with negative repercussions to a degree. The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is a treaty in the works since 2011 that seeks to expand the Copyright Treaty on a vast scale at the demise of internet privacy and widespread access to basic medicines. In addition, new technologies and discoveries like artificial genes continue to question specifically what the World Intellectual Property Organization should protect. The United Nations must also consider whether it is in the best interest to expand intellectual protection or to limit the power of the the World Intellectual Property Organization.

    The Kingdom of Swaziland is fairly new to the scheme of Intellectual Property. However, Swaziland is becoming more prevalent every year shown by recent statistics. Swaziland currently does not offer protection for intellectual property under their law, but they do have laws pending to protect it. Although Swaziland, an undeveloped country, has a lot of progress to make, this decision will have a large impact on the economy and market because it will affect business relations, access to medicine, and the development of the country.

    The delegation of Swaziland seeks to limit the powers of the World Intellectual Property Organization. Swaziland holds the perspective of an undeveloped country infrastructurally, economically, industrially, and commercially. Swaziland will be hit first by even less access to basic medicine that this country already desperately needs. In addition, increasing intellectual rights will create a less competitive market making it harder for Swaziland and other undeveloped countries to one day thrive. Finally, it would impede new ideas and innovations within Swaziland. For an undeveloped or developing country, both competition and innovation are crucial in the process of modernization; therefore it shall be in the best interest of the countries striving to develop to reject strengthening the World Intellectual Property Organization. The delegation of Swaziland would like to invite undeveloped or developing countries around the world, and specifically in Africa to join together to keep World Intellectual Property Organization from expanding.

  • Lillywaterfall
    Lillywaterfall November 15, 2017 Reply

    SUBMITTED TO: Legal
    FROM: Botswana
    SUBJECT: Intellectual Property

    Without the creative minds within our country, and many other creative and hardworking countries. Without these innovative thinkers within our, and other societies, we may have never created new, genuine ideas that could possibly change the world. Thankfully, many conventions have helped protect intellectual property rights. From the Berne Convention to help of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), and the Trade-Related aspects of intellectual property rights, better known as the TRIPS agreement. The WTO is an organization that helps regulate trade and services between countries with intellectual properties rights to provide a solid framework for trade agreements. The TRIPS agreements revolves around two main topics; copyright rights and rights of artists ext. We have signed this agreement for many reasons; to protect the right of the creative minds and ideas (including trade) for the better for the nations as a whole.
    The TRIPS agreement, includes many benefits for trade within the WTO, and copyright laws for others. TRIPS reinforces ideas and rules stated in the Berne Convention, the main ideas of WIPO and the Paris convention. With the new ideas and constant change in morally correct rights, the IP rights and rules are changing and becoming more specific day by day. There are several additional bills and laws Botswana has passed that go beyond to make sure the enforcement of IP rights are followed. From large ideas of looking over trade, and international treaties, to a much smaller scale of simple copyright laws, intellectual property is a large topic in which Botswana continuously supports the ideas and agreements with the UN and Botswana continues to pass and ratify to ensure safety and security of these rights on a smaller scale within our country to ensure intellectual property rights of all kinds will not be ignored.
    A resolution Botswana would like to see is all nations of the the UN to realize the importance of intellectual property rights. The importance of these rights vary from looking over trade agreements (which is extremely beneficial with the UN so we can resolve and end the disagreements between countries), to simply protecting rights of common citizen within your society and ours. The more established and specific these treaties and conventions become, the more beneficial it will be to all of us in the long run. Broad statements lead to confusion. Tight and narrow rules with expectations and guidelines lead to the change in a community and the world. Botswana doesn’t single out any one country for their views on intellectual rights, but just hopes to continuously see changes and more countries realizing the importance of these rights.

  • Kayzubkus
    Kayzubkus November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Bangladesh
    Forest Hills Northern High School
    Kay Zubkus

    Intellectual property refers to creations of the mind such as creative works of art, books, inventions, symbols, and names. These said creations are protected by law under copyrights, trademarks, and patents that give the creator credit for their work. The people of Bangladesh fully support the implementation of IP laws in order to foster creativity as well as economic growth.

    As a member of the WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) since 1985, Bangladesh has taken very few measures to insure IPP for its citizens. It is estimated that 90% of all creative works from businesses, such as software, are pirated. In response to this the BSA, the Software Alliance, in partnership with the iIPB (Intellectual Property Rights Association of Bangladesh) founded an office in Bangladesh as of 2014 in order to improve the IPP as well as public awareness of the topic. They elected to accept the Paris Convention on Intellectual Property of 1991, but they are struggling to find a legislative frame that incorporates and agrees with The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TIPS). However, they have passed legislation on the Copyright Act of 2000, the Trademark Act in 2009, and The Geographical Indication of Goods Act of 2013. Certain government agencies are taking action against counterfeiting as well as pirating such as the NBR/Customs, Mobile Courts, and the Rapid Action Battalion (RAB).

    Since the implementation of such legislation, the number of counterfeit cases taken on by Bangladesh authorities has risen exponentially due to the increase in awareness of IPP. However, there is still more work to be done through enforcement of IPP laws in the individual states as well as through the UN. Bangladesh would also like to see greater protection against cyber criminals in order to punish those who try to go against country and UN laws.

  • EthanChu123
    EthanChu123 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Canada
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    School: Williamston High School
    Delegate: Ethan Chu

    In order to bolster a country’s economy, some countries in the United Nations (UN)provide ways to protect an owner’s creative workers through Intellectual Property (IP). The Paris and Berne Conventions revised in the late 19th Century form foundation for International Intellectual Property still in use today. The Foundations of IP International Protection have started to crumble under the weight of 21st Century innovation. For example, technically advanced countries including Canada, United States, United Kingdom, Australia and Japan have argued rightly that advanced biotech such as artificial genes are not currently governed under international IP protection. The outdated foundations of International IP Protection could not have predicted the stifling of smaller start up tech companies innovations, by large tech corporations. For instance, major tech companies like… Samsung and Apple Inc use IP Protections to squash competing firms out of the market. Finally, piracy of intellectual property continues to be difficult to enforce in the digital age. This is evident by the growing list of US-based companies accusing the People’s Republic of China of allowing domestic firms to steal foreign IP. With these salient 21st century pressures in mind it is time to for the World Trade Organization to reform their policies including the Trade- Related Aspect of Intellectual Property (TRIPS) Agreement, which attempts to set a fair playing field or companies working internationally, and other policies that attempt to establish fairness in International Intellectual Property Protection.

    Canada has been encouraging the reform of WTO policies for international IP protection. WTO made a decision to waive certain provisions of the TRIPS Agreement, which would prevent developing and developed WTO-member countries from importing less-expensive versions of patented pharmaceutical products under compulsory licence. Canada was the first country to take advantage of this decision by passing new legislation that require reform in Canada’s Patent Act, Food and Drugs Act, and their corresponding regulations. The challenge for Canada was to establish an effective system that removes barrier to deliver affordable pharmaceutical products to countries in need while making sure they are not used for industrial or commercial objectives. When the decision to change policies of the TRIPS Agreement was decide to concluded its access to medicines negotiations, Canada welcomed this agreement as positively demonstrating how WTO members can work together to respond to the needs of other countries. Canada has also supported the continued flexibility in the TRIPS Agreement which allows WTO Members to decide whether or not to patent life forms, and Canada’s Supreme Court has decided that all matter up to a level of a plant or an animal, genetically modified or not, is patentable subject matter in Canada. Canada has also supported sui generis,which establishes a system to allow farmer to save and sow seed. Also, it establishes protection as long as the form of protection is adapted to a plant that meets objective criteria.

    Canada hopes to have reform over certain policies of IPs. For instance, the TRIPS Agreement has an obligation relating to all GIs, and it includes an enhanced protection for wine and spirits. As part of the World Wine Trade Group, Canada and other members that are both WTO and World Wine Trade Group members want to change the obligation to make a voluntary, facilitative, simple and low-cost registration system to provide information for CIs that are notified by members. Also, the Government of Canada’s Innovation Agenda and CIPO’s business are strategizing to take full advantage of global opportunities. The challenges for Canada is to get enough support to make this international reforms, and to develop the perfect system for Canada’s national changes to have IPs to be reward for their innovation and to protect them from other countries. In the end Canada wants the WTO to pass and reform policies to protect smaller business from major corporations that stop innovation, protect advance technology such as genetic research, and enforce the protection of IPs from being copyrighted infringement by other countries’ companies.

  • Calebgreene7
    Calebgreene7 November 15, 2017 Reply

    UN General Assembly 6th Committee
    Intellectual Property
    Australia
    Caleb Jeffery Greene

    Intellectual property are creative arts such as inventions, new medicines, and art that can be protected by trademarks. Australia respects intellectual property and just recently updated its regulations on intellectual property. The United Nations established the World Intellectual Property Organization in order to protect new ideas and inventions. The World Intellectual Property Organization, or WIPO, was created in 1967 to encourage creative activity and to promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world. The Legal Committee should discuss this because it is very important to a thriving economy. Intellectual property is such an important aspect to our culture and economy that it must be protected. Australia wants to make sure that its citizen’s intellectual property is protected.

    Australia has set up IP Australia, our government agency to protect intellectual property. In 1904, the Federal Patent Office was established in Melbourne. Since then, the Federal Patent Office has been protecting intellectual property from basic ideas to revolutionary inventions. Australia believes that everyone intellectual property should be protected. Australia worked with the World Trade Organization to promote the newly implemented WTO’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, and also in the World Intellectual Property Organization. Australia passed the Patents Act in 1990 and the Trade Marks Act in 1995. Australia is part of the United Nation’s World Intellectual Property Organization. Australia also is part of WTO’s Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property. Australia received 28 605 standard patent applications in 2015. We will work to make sure that everyone of these patent holders do not have their idea stolen. According to Business Insider, the number one country producing counterfeit goods is China. The UN Office of Drugs and Crime, reported that almost 70% of all counterfeits seized globally came from China in 2008 to 2010. As a law abiding country, Australia urges every country to continue to support intellectual property laws.

    Australia recommends that the United Nations establish stricter regulations on intellectual property and stop the production of illegal counterfeits. By working with countries, such as China, who is one of the world’s leading producers in counterfeit items, we can stop this major issue. The World Intellectual Property Organization should further define the definition of intellectual property and take the necessary steps toward enforcing the intellectual property right laws and regulations. The United States Customs reported that 87% of the value of counterfeits seized originated in China. Countries around the world, specifically the border or customs of that specific country, should make sure a few counterfeit items make it into the country as possible in order to protect intellectual property. Australia recommends that the United Nations further enforce intellectual property rights regulations by making the punishments for producing counterfeits much stricter. As such a important aspect of our culture, intellectual property must be protected.

  • Calebgreene7
    Calebgreene7 November 15, 2017 Reply

    UN General Assembly 6th Committee
    Determining whether it is necessary to Re-Evaluate the Chemical Warfare Committee
    Australia
    Caleb Jeffery Greene

    Australia signed the Chemical Weapons Convention in January 1993 and ratified it in May 1994. Australia has abided by the regulations set by the committee. Australia has disposed of all of its chemical weapons, with the exception of a few World War II era chemical weapons which are immediately reported to the OPCW. However, they did stockpile Chemical weapons including mustard gas, phosgene, lewisite, adamsite and CN gas, in which were later disposed of. The United Nations needs to address this major issue and other countries need to discard of their chemical weapons, as Australia has already done. Australia wants to rid the world of these weapons for the good of humanity.

    Australia has seen the devastation that has occurred due to chemical weapons and is committed to solve the problem. Australia currently opposes chemical weapons and is currently an active player in the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which is working to end the production and use of chemical weapons. They are also part of the Chemical Weapons Convention, which requires the destruction of existing weapons and bans the development, production, possession or use of chemical weapons. Australia passed the Chemical Weapons (Prohibition) Act in 1994, which is actively working to end chemical weapons. The CWC needs to come together and sign a new resolution to make chemical weapon restrictions stricter.

    Australia recommends that the United Nations and the rest of the world works to end chemical weapons production and use. We have been actively supporting the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and abiding by the regulations set forth by the Chemical Weapons Convention. The Chemical Weapons Convention needs to convene to further solidify and expand the definition of a chemical weapon and also develop new and improved ways to stop them. Also, the Biological Weapons Convention should gather to update the definition of a biological weapon and discuss joining the two conventions. Australia would support a resolution to end chemical weapon use and production, and recommends that the international community do the same.

  • Ludwant
    Ludwant November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Brazil
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Delegate: Anton Ludwig
    School: East Grand Rapids High School

    Protecting intellectual property (IP) is a vital part of encouraging innovation across the globe. In today’s industrialized society, it is essential that entrepreneurs and innovators have a reason to continue to push the envelope, and thus boost the global economy. However, in order for people to reap the rewards of their efforts, IP protection must be an international effort. Countries across the globe must guard against counterfeit and piracy, in order for the system of globalization in which we now preside to work.
    Brazil believes that the best next step for international cooperation on this issue would be a more specific set of agreements regarding certain types of IP. For example, the new set of codes should address genetic information, as well as scientific research and data. A new set of guidelines will help clarify what member countries should follow. Brazil believes that more specific rules will encourage more advancements to be made.
    In regards to open source projects and the possible restrictions IP protections could have on new information, Brazil believes that while free and open information is essential for public knowledge, companies and organizations must have an incentive to continue innovating. Patents and trademarks help grow the economy, not just in the country of origin, but across the world as well. It is important that IP is guarded, but Brazil recognizes that this must be a worldwide effort.

  • GrantSizemore
    GrantSizemore November 15, 2017 Reply

    11-15-17
    SUBMITTED TO: Legal
    FROM: Republic of Chad
    SUBJECT: International Intellectual Property Protection

    The Republic of Chad wants to ask the committee a question about theft and ownership, do you like someone making a profit off of your ideas and talents? The answer is an obvious no. So that means we need to do a better job of protecting our International Intellectual Properties.

    The Republic of Chad believes that we as a committee need to ask ourselves a very important question, How are we going to do a better job of protecting our International Intellectual Properties? Another question we must ask is, How are we going to enforce/entice nations to ensure the protection of International Intellectual Properties?

    The Republic of Chad encourages the committee to find way to enforce and enact the protection of our International Intellectual Properties. The Republic of Chad would also like to make the protection of the International Intellectual Properties more accessible and affordable for all nations. As a member of the African Intellectual Property Organization (OAPI) and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the Republic of Chad would like to see the policies of these organizations implemented in our debate and resolutions. Theses are some goals the Republic of Chad would like to see met during committee.

    The Republic of Chad is looking forward to debate on the topic of International Intellectual Property Protection. The Republic of Chad feels that the protection of International Intellectual Properties is very important and is looking forward to finding ways to better protect them.

    • avatar image
      Grant Sizemore November 22, 2017 Reply

      Grant Sizemore
      Royal Oak High School

  • Mccarthyk
    Mccarthyk November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal Committee
    International Intellectual Property Rights
    Cambodia
    Katie McCarthy

    Well after the Berne and Paris IP Conventions, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) was generated to create and encourage more protection for intellectual property which includes patents, copyright, and trademarks. However, advancements in technology and medicine have lead to troubles with intellectual property rights worldwide. Countries have been conflicted on whether to patent synthesized substances from lab work or research. The main source of this problem is finding a balance for both a short and long period of time.

    As a member of WIPO, Cambodia strongly encourages the changes necessary to protect IP rights. They have created their own committee within the nation, the Department of Intellectual Property Rights, which has enforced and made protection for trademarks and patents more secure. In working with WIPO, Cambodia has also become a member of the committee on the Law of Patents and Law of Trademarks (SLP) and (SLT). In these two conventions, guidance is provided on the improvements of patents and trademarks. The country of Cambodia hopes to contribute within these establishments and develop a plan that benefits all nations.

    Nationally, Cambodia has passed legislation laws such as a Law of Copyrights. This has provided protection within the country for certain IP rights after accusations of “weak enforcements.” Cambodia has also made agreements with other countries such as the United States, Thailand, and China for further protection and collaboration on IP rights and improvements. Furthermore, the country along with other participating nations have worked with the World Trade Organization (WTO) on several bills and enacted the necessary. The state of Cambodia is working on achieving as many rules, laws and committees as possible to provide more protection, security and less crime within the nation.

  • MattCatchick
    MattCatchick November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Tajikistan
    Matt Catchick

    All around the world, businesses and countries are affected by Property Rights. Intellectual Property Rights can be extremely beneficial, but spanning across different countries one will see a wide variety of protections and violations. Intellectual Property is a rapidly changing area. Intellectual property can be extremely valuable, thus the need for protection and enforcement. Patents and copyrights can be very profitable, and influence economies. Countries with a strong economy can grow even stronger, and, weaker economies can be made stronger. Intellectual Property is a very important and constantly developing area across the world. Tajikistan joined World International Property Organization (WIPO) in 1991. The nation of Tajikistan is in favor of increasing security and harsher punishment for those who violate the laws established therein. Tajikistan would like to further IP rights, as they are beneficial to the economy, but need to be regulated and amended to be more strict and specific.
    In developing countries, the enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) is much more difficult. The nation of Tajikistan recognizes this fact, and submits that this must be addressed in order to effectively protect intellectual property. Developing countries lack resources to enforce strict Property Rights. This is a considerable problem, as many developing countries face violations of these rights, usually in the form of large amounts of counterfeit products and piracy. The benefits of having a stricter set of rules is that they can terminate, with proper execution, many of the piracies and counterfeits of movies, TV shows, and other media products. The Tajik government is currently working on developing an implementation work plan and attempting to attract technical assistance in removing such violations. The Tajik government has also adopted a 2014-2020 National Strategy for the Development of Intellectual Property in early 2016. Tajikistan also possesses the Department on Disclosing and Seizing of Counterfeit Products within the Customs Service of Tajikistan. Tajikistan also has a branch of Law on Quality and Safety of Products, which requires IPR violators to pay all expenses for storage, transportation, and destruction of counterfeit goods. These programs are a well-founded start to a bigger, stricter enforcement on IP violations, but requires further examination, execution, and funding. The big flaw of this act is that Tajikistan, along with many other countries, lack proper funding as well as resources to both promote and protect intellectual property. With the proper funding, resources, and time, a successful program can encourage technological and creative advancement, while preserving rights and economic gain.

  • Will_Mester
    Will_Mester November 15, 2017 Reply

    November 8, 2017
    SUBMITTED TO: Legal
    FROM: The Republic of Cuba
    SUBJECT: International Intellectual Property Protection

    The Republic of Cuba recognizes the importance of Intellectual Property and believes it is of the utmost importance to protect this property. Cuba is a member of most treaties that relate to the protection of Intellectual Property laws such as the Patent Cooperation Treaty and the World Intellectual Property Organization. As well as participating on an International scale, Cuba has created an extensive infrastructure for the protection of IP (Intellectual Property) that could potentially be model for new IP laws.
    Though Cuba is involved with these organizations and treaties, we believe the question of how to protect Intellectual Property on an international scale is a difficult one to answer as there is a vast amount of Treaties and Laws that try to protect IP.
    The Republic of Cuba asks the committee, how can we reduce all the specific IP documents and create something that makes international IP easier to understand? How will we enforce this “merger” of documents and how will we regulate the international markets and protect the business’s IP?
    The Republic of Cuba believes the committee can accomplish these goals within 1-2 resolutions. One dealing with the merger of ideas from a multitude of IP protection related documents and the other establishing how we will enforce the merger. If we do this right, the resolutions will extensively layout how to protect all forms of IP and how to enforce the protection.
    This will not be an easy task for the committee but the delegation of Cuba believes it is possible and we look forward to working with others to create 1-2 resolutions that not only protect International IP laws, but enforce them as well.

    • Will_Mester
      Will_Mester November 22, 2017 Reply

      November 8, 2017
      SUBMITTED TO: Legal
      FROM: The Republic of Cuba
      SUBJECT: International Intellectual Property Protection
      NAME: William Mester

      The Republic of Cuba recognizes the importance of Intellectual Property and believes it is of the utmost importance to protect this property. Cuba is a member of most treaties that relate to the protection of Intellectual Property laws such as the Patent Cooperation Treaty and the World Intellectual Property Organization. As well as participating on an International scale, Cuba has created an extensive infrastructure for the protection of IP (Intellectual Property) that could potentially be model for new IP laws.
      Though Cuba is involved with these organizations and treaties, we believe the question of how to protect Intellectual Property on an international scale is a difficult one to answer as there is a vast amount of Treaties and Laws that try to protect IP.
      The Republic of Cuba asks the committee, how can we reduce all the specific IP documents and create something that makes international IP easier to understand? How will we enforce this “merger” of documents and how will we regulate the international markets and protect the business’s IP?
      The Republic of Cuba believes the committee can accomplish these goals within 1-2 resolutions. One dealing with the merger of ideas from a multitude of IP protection related documents and the other establishing how we will enforce the merger. If we do this right, the resolutions will extensively layout how to protect all forms of IP and how to enforce the protection.
      This will not be an easy task for the committee but the delegation of Cuba believes it is possible and we look forward to working with others to create 1-2 resolutions that not only protect International IP laws, but enforce them as well.

      • Will_Mester
        Will_Mester November 22, 2017 Reply

        This Position Paper has been submitted by William Mester from Royal Oak High School, The Cuban Delegate, to the Legal committee.

  • Ecbonnell
    Ecbonnell November 15, 2017 Reply

    Argentina
    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Ethan Bonnell

    Intellectual Property (IP) provides a basis for our economies, for the continual growth and development of new ideas. IP Protections are something that most countries agree we should have, but international rollout of those policies has been less than perfect. In order for countries to all protect the rights of their own artists and inventors, there must be standardized methods of protecting IP across all nations.

    Argentina, admittedly, has been part of the problem in years past. Though Argentina is a member of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), it has in the past lacked the judicial efficiency necessary for admitting intellectual property from other countries, leading to a delay of new ideas being spread into the Argentinian market due to a lack of a strong patent system. And Argentina is a comparatively able country. These issues plague most nations, with piracy running wild and with a legal system unable to keep up with the constant demands of IP owners from other countries.

    The UN has a responsibility to make it easier for countries to share IP with others. Argentina would recommend the creation of a resolution with similar goals to the Patent Cooperation Treaty but in a more simplified way. Argentina would wish to see standard guidelines for what a Patent would entail and more standard regulations for intellectual property, as to make it easier for countries to enforce regulations and create guidelines for national standards in a way that seeks to advance the global economy as effectively as possible.

  • Luisv.
    Luisv. November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal Committee
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Norway
    Luis F. Vazquez

    Intellectual property has been a rising topic of discussion with new developments technology. The base of intellectual property protection comes from the Paris and Berne conventions of the late 19th century. It is essential for the World Intellectual Property Organization to understand the economic repercussions of increasing IP protection. In 1995 all members of the world trade organization (WTO) signed the TRIPS Agreement which is the most complex treaty which attempts to set a fair playing field for companies. Patents have recently been seen and used as a method for companies to lower other companies shares only raising concerns for how far IP protection should really go. People’s growing concern for the accessibility of generic medicines has also been a debate on whether or not IP protected people or organizations should be allowed to have a monopoly over medicine. These are the argued topics needed to be readdressed because of older standards for IP protection.

    Norway understand that IP protection is essential for economies to grow and thrive. Evidence of which anyone can access shows that IP-based industries perform far better than non-IP based industries , providing better jobs and better pay for employees. As we are part of the world trade organization we have the TRIPS Agreement to help companies operate in other countries and provide for a fair playing field. We have been a part of the Paris Union Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, the Berne Copyright Convention, the Universal Copyright Convention of 1952, and the Rome Convention. Domestically we have established acts like Trade Marks Act, Designs Act, Plant Variety Act, Patents Act, Copyright Act, and the Industrial Property Office Act.

    Norway proposes that the UN and countries focus on allowing people and companies to innovate as well as allowing for economies to grow and thrive. People and companies losing the right of having IP protection would sharply disincentivize the innovation of new ideas that make our everyday lives easier. With decline of innovation would also come the rapid slow down of economic growth, affecting the world at large.

  • MoeOmran
    MoeOmran November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Mohamed Omran
    The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
    Forest Hills Northern

    Intellectual property refers to the inventions of the mind, since these are difficult to regulate, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) has been formed in order to protect those who do not have the means to protect their intellectual ideas. WIPO provides several crucial services, firstly, they protect those who have intellectual ideas to enhance the quality of life on earth, second, WIPO provides arbitration and mediation during disputes, as an alternative to long and expensive court trials. WIPO’s services helps developing nations as these countries may continue to develop with new, more effective technology or intellectual ideals. WIPO has allowed several monumental ideas to flourish.

    Over the course of the past few decades, Jordan has undergone several large changes to adopt a more open-market economy, ensuring greater inventions and higher levels of competition. To Jordan, building an effective and safe IP system allows future generations to live more fulfilling lives and prepares us for more innovative inventions. Jordan has increased its publicity of WIPO and IP rights in recent years, using a cartoon sketch which was shown to students, businesses, and just every day regular people. The outreach program was a massive success and Jordan is already planning a second one, this will promote the invaluable information that can be found in WIPO and inform the younger portions of this generation about the possibilities with IP. Next, Jordan hopes to crackdown on online piracy and other forms of counterfeit as it is harming the economy, there is still work to be done, but the ongoing improvements in WIPO and IP awareness and usage in Jordan remains encouraging.

    Ideally, the Kingdom of Jordan would like to see narrower, more specific IP laws as they would help prevent the increasing high levels of piracy and forgery on the internet. This only hurts the innovators who have produced high standard work. These restrictions would be a strict crackdown on a growing epidemic, helping solve a potential economic and IP disaster.

  • Reianz
    Reianz November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Country: Iraq
    Name: Reian Zhang

    During the previous Iraqi regime (Saddam Hussein Regime), there was little attention devoted to developing IPR-related regulations to keep pace with global advances. Intellectual property remained a low priority task for the Iraqi authority because of the security and economic issues facing the country. (Gulf War and Iraq War) However, prior to the creation of the World Trade Organization and the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement (TRIPS) in 1994, Iraq had enacted several laws to deal with all areas of intellectual property rights (Trademarks, Copyrights, and Patents). For instance, Iraq has signed the Convention establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in 1971 (and became a member in 1976) and has joined the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property 1976. However, to date, Iraq has not yet become a member of the WTO, as one of the conditions to joining the WTO is the enactment of regulations that comply with the TRIPS.

    Trademark infringement, and counterfeiting, in particular, has increased in Iraq over the last decade which is in part due to the political unrest in the country. In order to prevent issues similar to trademark infringement, Iraq believes that an increase in intellectual property laws will help. Since Iraq want to build its economy and become more open to international trade, they have demonstrated the desirability of adopting modern intellectual property standards. Iraq’s constitution also protects the freedom of speech and expression and therefore believes that intellectual property laws should not suppress this right. Iraq encourages the protection of intellectual property in its nation as well as other nations.

  • Laurenea
    Laurenea November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: Intellectual Property Protection Rights
    Country: Pakistan

    In 2005, Pakistan created the Intellectual Property Organization of Pakistan (IPO). Currently there are eight types of intellectual property rights protection being offered or are in-process in Pakistan including patents, copyright, and trademarks. Over a decade after its creation, the administrative control of the IPO was transferred from the Cabinet Division to the Commerce Division. Pakistan’s vision for intellectual property is “to put Pakistan on the intellectual property map of the world as a compliant and responsible country by promoting and protecting intellectual property rights”. Pakistan is planning to do this by integrating and upgrading the intellectual property infrastructure for improved service delivery, increased public awareness, and enhanced enforcement coordination for achieving the goal of being an intellectual property based nation.
    The future plan for the IPO of Pakistan is to develop and customize the ERP for IPO’s headquarters, the Patent Office, Copyright Office, Trademark Registry and Regional Office Lahore for: Internal Communication & movement of Files, Finance and Budgeting Management, Inventory and Procurement Management, Human Resource Management, Integrated Reporting System, Biometric Time attendance system. To improve library and related facilities for internal and external users of Patent Office/TMR/Copyright/HQs. Online Application submission, Online Payments, Online IP Records Search, Online Correspondence with Clients.
    The biggest issue for Pakistan is funding and staff. There are 50 officers and 174 staff. During this conference Pakistan would like to further solidify ways and means to upgrade the intellectual property infrastructure within Pakistan and internationally. Because almost 45% of the application for foreign brands were from the United Kingdom, 13% from the United states, 9% from China, and less than that from Germany, Japan, France, south Korea, India, Singapore, and Australia.

  • Jpetruska111
    Jpetruska111 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Rights
    Republic of Vietnam
    Joey Petruska

    International Intellectual Property Rights have been around since the Paris and Berne Conventions in the 19th century. The Berne Convention created an organization that reviews International agreements concerning Intellectual properties. Governments often will provide rights and protection to these properties in order to keep their economies stable and successful. Vietnam sees this as an important issue because we believe that we shouldn’t have a constant fear of piracy. This is why IPRs are in place and supported in Vietnam by National Office of Intellectual Property ( NOIP).

    In recent years, IP protection has been a growing concern in The Republic of Vietnam. Unfortunately, we are one of the leading countries in the issue of piracy. More and more electronic products are being illegally downloaded and sold without government regulation. To counteract this we have passed minor punishments such as fines and warnings. Furthermore, Vietnam has joined organizations such as WIPO to crack down on issues relating to IPs.

    During this committee Vietnam would like to see harsher consequences for cyber crimes like piracy. We also want better security and protection on an international level to fight the theft of International Intellectual Properties. We encourage other countries to come to a similar conclusion.

  • Haquez
    Haquez November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Qatar
    Zaid Haque

    Intellectual property (IP) allows for protection of peoples rights to create products with little to no fear of others claiming their creations. This ensures that creators are rewarded for their work, while promoting healthy competition and economics. As the strong advancements of technology occur, the greater necessity for protection for the creator, the product, and the idea itself. Qatar seeks to pursue a more knowledge-based economy as it relieves itself from its reliance on oil and gasoline. While the intellectual property regime in Qatar is strong and widespread, yet still developing, it emphasizes the substantial need for protection.

    Qatar is a part of The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) since 1976, and also a member of the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). In addition to the WIPO, Qatar follows standard procedures for national IP laws and regulations and also implements the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) procedures for new entries. Qatar further emphasized the importance of multiple local IP laws such as the introduction of the Trademark and Copyright law in 2002, the Protection of Trade Secrets and Protection of Layout Design law passed in 2005, and enacting a Patent Law in 2006. These local laws protect both citizens and foreign applicants, and the local laws have a heavier precedence compared to the state and national laws. Recently, Qatar has forbidden the entry of any products that infringe upon IP rights. The General Customs Authority in Qatar takes preventive measures to sustain IP rights such as raiding shops and seizing counterfeit products.

    Qatar believes that IP laws need to be implemented in order expand economies and increase competition. IP regulations should be employed based on a country’s needs. In addition, sanctions should be placed on countries that do not adhere to the laws and regulations. Qatar has made significant progress in elevating its IP laws and hopes that countries can come to an agreement on securing IP rights.

  • RTalla
    RTalla November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal Committee
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Philippines
    Rushil Talla

    Around the world, people are continuously coming up with new ideas and inventions that could potentially serve as income generators that allow the inventors to live happy lives, but, to a larger extent, these inventions also produce an increase in a country’s GDP as it adds a new product into the market, causing increases in exports and consumer spending for the country. When another country takes a large idea that could be turned into a product that would benefit the people, they are essentially robbing money from the inventor’s country and harming the country’s economic growth. That’s why the global rules known as Intellectual Property Protection were formed. Intellectual Property Protection sets rules for protecting property in the shape of ideas with methods such as patents, copyrights, and trademarks in order to protect inventors from the theft of their ideas and to protect the country’s economy. Over time, there has been less enforcement of these laws in various countries, such as China, making the IP Protection laws ineffective. Because these countries have reduced the amount of enforcement on these laws, the people within these countries have begun to steal Intellectual Property from the people in other countries again, harming the economies of the countries that have inventors that are being robbed.

    The Philippines understands that without Intellectual Property Protection, their country could end up losing potential money that could have boosted their economy. To prevent a loss in possible economic growth, the Philippine government decided to protect the Intellectual Property within the country’s borders. They officially made it a state policy to protect and promote intellectual property rights when it was included in their constitution in 1973. Seven years later, in 1980, the Philippines became a member of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and signed a number of international agreements for the protection and promotion of intellectual property rights, such as the act to create a patent office, and an act that established procedure for appeals from the decisions of quasi-judicial officers. The Philippines has a first-to-file system which means that the idea belongs to whoever put a patent on it first. An invention patent currently lasts 20 years from the filing date, a utility model has protection for seven years from the filing date, industrial designs have five years but can be renewed twice for five more years each, and copyrights last for the creator’s lifetime and 50 years after death. The Philippines currently enforces intellectual property rights with criminal prosecution and administrative actions. Administration actions are usually used the most because they cost less time and money than criminal prosecution. These laws have helped decrease the value of counterfeit goods from US $302 million in 2014 to US $45 million in 2015. Although there has been a decrease in the infringement of goods, the policies still require improvements to remove the counterfeiting of inventions. Current enforcement actions aren’t strong and don’t effectively take care of violators. IP infringement isn’t considered a major crime in the Philippines, it has a low priority in court proceedings, and lawsuits tend to take years. IPOPHL reported that only 42 percent of cases received in 2015 ended with convicting the person who committed the crime.

    Philippines would like to propose that the most appropriate way to protect Intellectual Property moving forward would be to employ stricter enforcement over existing IP protections. As of now, the countries are the ones that decide for themselves how to enforce IP protection and they tend to let loose and not give importance to IP protection. Instead, all of the countries should come together and form a set of laws that define how all the counties are to enforce IP protection. People who steal Intellectual Property should be imprisoned for 4 to 6 years and they should be fined the amount of money they have produced from stealing the idea. A resolution that makes all countries strictly enforce IP protection and gives a common set of punishments to all violators of the law will prevent the theft of ideas and allow for the growth of countries’ economies without the setbacks caused by the theft of Intellectual Property.

  • Phungjohncity
    Phungjohncity November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal: Re-Evaluating the Chemical Weapons Convention
    Belgium
    John Phung

    As we reexamine the use of chemical weapons in the 20th century, Belgium suffered in WWI due to its unexpected interactions with the first time use of chemical weapons hurting million of soldiers and civilians in the European region. Belgium still finds more than 200 tons of active munitions while 5% of are chemical weapons. Belgian actively cooperates with Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) through its discovery and disarmament of those chemical weapons through the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company of the Belgian Army,

    One of Belgium’s most notably policies against chemical weapons was the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which Belgium signed in 1968 and ratified in 1975. In this treaty Belgium heavily emphasized the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, the ultimate removal of all nuclear weapons and the international cooperation to limit their use of chemical weapons. As an active member of the Chemical Weapon Conventions (CWC) since 1997, Belgium’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs oversees the reports of such chemicals demonstrating Belgium’s transparency to the CWC and its full cooperation to the convention. In addition Belgium is a part of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Biological and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (BTWC) which aims to prevent the spread of deadly disease through any means. Belgium believes toxic biological agents that carries deadly disease, viruses, or bacteria should never be possessed by any country. In addition, Belgium deposed a proposal of amendment to the Rome Statue that regulates the International Criminal Court (ICC) in order to qualify the use of biological weapons for war purposes. To maintain this international peace Belgium ask other delegations to limit the proliferation weapons and adding stricter legislation for the use of chemical or biological weapons to prevent this expansion of mass destruction that we have witnessed in the 20th century. Belgium hopes that the production of chemical weapons are reduced therefore we ask other delegations to continue to actively cooperate with the CWC to eliminate the use of any biological agent capable of causing massive mortality rates.

  • Jaziegler00
    Jaziegler00 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    Re-evaluating the Chemical Warfare Convention
    Algeria
    Jack Anthony Ziegler
    Algeria is a country in the northwestern region of Africa which was given independence in the year 1962. One issue that Algeria is faced with is the issue of Intellectual Property Protection, which deals with the issues of products being patented and copyrighted. The issues of Intellectual Protection also is important for many thriving economies and to reward the creator of important and popular products that are commonly used. Patents, trademarks and copyright are protected in Algeria. For patents, requests for information should be made to the Algerian Institute of Standardization and Industrial Property (INAPI).
    The types of Property protection vary in validity in Algeria for different lengths of time. Patents are valid for 20 years, Trademarks are valid for 10 years, and copyrights are valid during the author’s lifetime, plus an additional 50 years. This is important for companies and people to have protection over the products that they have created and for them to be rewarded for what they have done. It is also good for the country to support intellectual property protection because it can then forward the economy, which is important in a developing country such as Algeria. Algeria joined the WIPO in 1975, which is World Intellectual Property Organization. WIPO is an international organization that oversees international treaties governing IP protection, and has become a specialized agency of the United Nations in 1974. In 1995, all members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) signed the TRIPS Agreement, the most comprehensive treaty to provide strong protections for IP rights.
    The protection of products in a developing country such as Algeria is vital to improving their rights and their economy. They are not having to deal with too large of companies and products being patented due to there not being many large products and companies from Algeria, but they are very good when it comes to the protection of their products with the use of copyrights, patents, and trademarks.

  • Asherlock
    Asherlock November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Rights
    Country: Ethiopia
    School: Forest Hills Northern High School
    Alison Sherlock

    Ethiopia firmly believes that all intellectual rights need to be protected. We believe that intellectual property rights need to change in a way to help benefit smaller, poorer, countries in order to ensure that IP right’s don’t exclusively favor powerful countries. Ethiopia is of the opinion that this needs to solved on the international level.

    IP is needed for developing countries, such as ourselves. We need to be able to protect the innovations that are made in our country. These innovations can be crucial to developing our industry further and bring much need revenue to the people of our country. We suggest that the Legal committee work to help developing nations spread information and resources to the people of these nations in order to help obtain them patents, trademarks, and similar intellectual protection. Ethiopia has been member of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) since 1998. We believe that all countries would benefit from joining WIPO, as they have helped and work to improve intellectual property rights for developing nations, but of course there is still work to do.

    Through cooperation and diplomacy Ethiopia hopes that this legal counsel will help create more opportunities for those in developing nations. Ethiopia is especially hoping to see an untied African block and wants developing nations to come together to provide a check on the power of the economically prosperous countries.

  • Jarichards
    Jarichards November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Greece (The Hellenic Republic)
    Joseph Richards

    Greece firmly supports intellectual property protection. Intellectual property refers to the creations of an individual’s mind that can generally be used in commerce. It is divided into two distinct categories, Industrial Property, which includes patents for inventions, industrial designs, and trademarks. Copyrights cover works of literacy such as novels, poems, and plays. Greece has taken a number of steps to help in the fight for global Intellectual property rights. Joining the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in 1976, participating in the Paris Convention for Protection of Industrial Property, The European Patent Convention, The Washington Patent Cooperation Treaty, and the Bern Copyright Convention. As a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Greece signed the TRIPS Agreement which enabled a fair playing field for companies operating over national borders. Greece incorporated the WTO-TRIPS agreement into Greek legislation on February 28, 1995 (Law 2290/1995). The enforcement of property rights in Greece is existent and supported, however, rights holders have continued to have problems even with the new legislation. Greece recently moved to further improve intellectual property enforcement by establishing the Ministry of Public Order and Citizen protection. This department has allowed the government to better protect copyright protection online but has yet to get a law passed to properly protect software licensing.

    Intellectual property rights are crucial for economic growth. These rights provide citizens an incentive for the creation of new works. The lack of Intellectual property rights eliminates the incentive for creation and innovation, which is what stimulates economic growth. Creative works are vital to modern day economics and Greece strongly believes that it is the obligation of government to provide individuals and organization and protection of intellectual property. The emergence of new technologies, including software, domain names, websites, web and mobile applications has made it difficult for most governments to enforce intellectual property rights, particularly when it comes to software.

    Greece would like the United Nations to whatever steps that are necessary to increase the protection of Intellectual property.

  • 09884
    09884 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Country: Panama
    Vicksburg High School

    Intellectual property is the use of copyrights, trademarks, or patents to be a legal owner of an idea or concept. The benefits and protection of these differ in each country, but the main goal is usually the same: protecting the ideas that may lead to a stronger business or economy. There are products being made and thought up everyday that could lead to a change in a nation’s economy and boost the national welfare.

    However, while the inventor of a product may be protected from IP theft in that particular country there is nothing stopping another person from around the world from taking the idea and using it for themselves. There are guidelines and regulations that prohibit this, but they are not enforced as well as they should be.

    Intellectual property, and the protection of said property, is important to the Republic of Panama. Panama joined the World Intellectual Property Organization in 1983, in hopes to make a stable set of regulations to help promote the protection of intellectual property. The Panamanian government sees intellectual property theft as a crime, and punishes those who commit it. The Republic of Panama hopes to see more guidelines made, and followed, for the betterment of the protection offered for intellectual property around the world.

    While the making and enforcing new regulations could hurt an economy temporarily by making it harder to obtain the patents and copyrights or trademarks, Panama believes the long term effects will help those countries by giving better protection to their intellectual property. The Republic of Panama looks forward to further discussing the topic in committee.

  • 18statteka
    18statteka November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Germany
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: Intellectual Property Rights
    Delegate: Kathleen Stattelman
    School: Williamston High School

    Intellectual property rights are defined by the World International Property Organization as regarding “creations of the mind” and being “like any other property right. They allow creators, or owners, of patents, trademarks or copyrighted works to benefit from their own work or investment in a creation.” Intellectual property is a matter of the utmost significance, as it establishes a foundation for commerce, innovation, technology and culture to continue to evolve and grow. As such, it is integral to the prosperity of the global market that intellectual rights receive the highest attention in allocating protections. There are several facets of intellectual properties that can generally be placed into two categories: copyright that encompasses artistic property such as works of literature, cinema, or music and industrial property which includes trademarks, and patents.
    Germany is reverent in the belief that both require equal attention, yet should be addressed in light of their separate contexts. Additionally, Germany is aware that this issue is one of ever changing circumstance and complications as new technologies and attitudes continue to develop. The movements to democratization of information, and allowance for open access reflect these shifts. The beginning of recognition for intellectual properties was created with the establishment of The Paris and Berne Conventions of which Germany was an active participant. Germany adheres to the policy that artists and creators should receive full protections internationally, a sentiment that is further reflected by its’ involvement in the Universal Copyright Convention, the Patent Cooperation Treaty, the Geneva Phonograms Convention, and the Treaty of Rome on Neighboring Rights. Within its domestic nation, Germany has strong enforcement of these policies, yet issues regarding counterfeit goods and piracy remain. Nevertheless, Germany grants national treatment to foreign copyright holders as well as legal protection for performing artists. Germany has an effective enforcement policy shaped by WIPO Internet treaties, EU enforcement directives, and more. Germany allocates the same policy to foreigners as German nationals in regards to registering for trademarks and patents. However, Germany does not recognize of IP rights.

    Going forth, Germany would like to see a more standardized approach in matters of intellectual property rights. Every year, the German General Customs Authority publishes statistics on custom seizures of counterfeit and pirated goods. Germany would urge for an initiative launched through WIPO to allow all nation states to create a similar publication. In this way, a cohesive base of knowledge on the severity of these issues can be properly garnered. Additionally, Germany would advocate for the create of sub bodies within WIPO to address copyright, trademarks, and patents independently. Germany believes that legislation can be formed to mitigate the confusion and repercussions brought by the international aspect of IP protections. Within these bodies, Germany would hope to see policies that grant equal access to trademarks and patents for foreigners and citizens in the participating offices of each nation and hopes that fellow European Union members reflect this goal.

  • Jeev3s
    Jeev3s November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Country: Bhutan
    Delegate: Rajeev Nag, FH Northern HS

    Intellectual property is an invention resulting from creativity, which one can have the rights for. Intellectual property rights are similar to any other rights. They allow owners of patents or creations to benefit from their work. The Intellectual Property system is an extremely important part of economic growth, allowing the least developed countries in the world to grow. On July 14th, 1967, the WIPO or World Intellectual Property Organization was founded to promote and protect intellectual property throughout the world.
    The intellectual property situation is still relatively new in Bhutan, because this concept was only introduced to Bhutan very recently. Bhutan would like an Intellectual Property system that encourages creative activities by assuring fair returns to creators, which then promotes economic development and improvement of living standards in Bhutan.
    On April 4, 1997 the Royal Government of Bhutan adopted the Industrial Property Regulations, introducing a system to protect intellectual property rights in the country. Bhutan aims to create an environment for its citizens that will give them many economic opportunities.
    By adopting this policy, Bhutan hopes to grow its economy and improve the standard of living for its citizens. Bhutan joined the WIPO- the World Intellectual Property Organization in 1994 and has since then created many laws involving Intellectual Property
    Bhutan strongly feels that being a part of the WIPO is an important way to boost its economy and promote growth, and believes that it’s crucial to protect intellectual property. The Bhutan Peace and Prosperity party was quoted as saying, “All efforts will be made to protect intellectual property rights such as patents, copyrights and trademarks. This will also cover the protection of indigenous knowledge, expertise and arts and crafts from foreign ownership or control.”

  • Hsanchez134
    Hsanchez134 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Rights
    People’s Republic of China
    Mark Sanchez

    Intellectual Property Rights are some of the most important aspects of a stable economy. The protection of Intellectual Rights allows businesses to benefit off of their own ideas without the fear of competition stealing their ideas to produce themselves. Recognizing the need for international law, the Berne Convention helped to establish an international organization for IP protection. This organization would eventually become known as the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), subsequently becoming a specialized agency in the United Nations.

    In order to safeguard these rights, the government of China has passed several pieces of legislation surrounding the topic of intellectual property rights: the Patent Law, the Trademark Law and the Copyright Law. These laws are fairly self explanatory, and as an example, the Trademark law sets out general guidelines on administration of trademarks, protection of trademark owner’s’ exclusive rights and maintenance of quality of products or services bearing the registered trademarks In addition to this, a great number of regulations, rules, measures and policies have been made by the NPC Standing Committee, the State Council and various ministries, bureaux and commissions. The circulars, opinions and notices of the Supreme People’s Court also form part of the legal framework. Through these measures, the People’s Republic of China has generated numerous safeguards to protect IPR.

    However, the People’s Republic of China does not feel that any more protections or treaties are necessary to protect Intellectual Property Rights. Organizations such as the World Intellectual Property Organization are more than sufficient to ensure that all nations that are a part of the organization follow the regulations set by the committee. Any further action from the committee will either result in redundancy or result in too many monopolistic corporations due to their ability to patent all aspects of their company.

  • Hsanchez134
    Hsanchez134 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Rights
    People’s Republic of China
    Mark Sanchez

    Intellectual Property Rights are some of the most important aspects of a stable economy. The protection of Intellectual Rights allows businesses to benefit off of their own ideas without the fear of competition stealing their ideas to produce themselves. Recognizing the need for international law, the Berne Convention helped to establish an international organization for IP protection. This organization would eventually become known as the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), subsequently becoming a specialized agency in the United Nations.

    In order to safeguard these rights, the government of China has passed several pieces of legislation surrounding the topic of intellectual property rights: the Patent Law, the Trademark Law and the Copyright Law. These laws are fairly self explanatory, and as an example, the Trademark law sets out general guidelines on administration of trademarks, protection of trademark owner’s’ exclusive rights and maintenance of quality of products or services bearing the registered trademarks In addition to this, a great number of regulations, rules, measures and policies have been made by the NPC Standing Committee, the State Council and various ministries, bureaux and commissions. The circulars, opinions and notices of the Supreme People’s Court also form part of the legal framework. Through these measures, the People’s Republic of China has generated numerous safeguards to protect IPRs.

    However, the People’s Republic of China does not feel that any more protections or treaties are necessary to protect Intellectual Property Rights. Organizations such as the World Intellectual Property Organization are more than sufficient to ensure that all nations that are a part of the organization follow the regulations set by the committee. Any further action from the committee will either result in redundancy or result in too many monopolistic corporations due to their ability to patent all aspects of their company.

  • Rafaelpaz
    Rafaelpaz November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Sweden
    Delegate: Rafael Paz
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY PROTECTION

    Swedish law generally provides adequate protection of all property rights, including intellectual property and real property. As a member of the European Union, Sweden adheres to a series of multilateral conventions on industrial, intellectual, and commercial property. These conventions are as follows:

    Patents
    “protection in all areas of technology may be obtained for 20 years. Sweden is a party to the Patent Cooperation Treaty and the European Patent Convention of 1973; both entered into force in 1978”
    Copyrights
    Sweden is a signatory to various multilateral conventions on the protection of copyrights, including the Berne Convention of 1971, the Rome Convention of 1961, and the WTO’s trade related intellectual property (TRIPS) agreement. Swedish copyright law protects computer programs and databases. More recently, Sweden gained notoriety as somewhat of a safe haven for internet piracy, due to rapid internet connection speeds, a lag in implementing EU Directives, and weak enforcement efforts. In 2009, however, Sweden implemented the EU’s Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED) 2004/48/EC, and continued to step up its enforcement against internet piracy. The last few years also saw the conviction of the operators behind the Pirate Bay.org, a notorious BitTorrent tracker for illegal file-sharing, and an increase in legal file-sharing. The 2010 appeal trial upheld the guilty verdict, signaling that Sweden is no longer a safe haven for internet piracy. Legislative measures, combined with added resources on the enforcement side and the emergence of successful legal alternatives all contributed to a substantial increase for music and film distribution using legal means since 2010. Moreover, Sweden has set up a Specialist Court for IPR-related cases, which will further increase efficiency by pooling specialist competence. The IP Court, the so-called Patent and Market Court, started operations on September 1, 2016.
    Trademarks
    Sweden protects trademarks under a specific trademark act (1960:644) and is a signatory to the 1989 Madrid Protocol.
    Trade Secrets
    Proprietary information is protected under Sweden’s patent and copyright laws unless acquired by a government ministry or authority, in which case it may be made available to the public on demand.
    Designs
    Sweden is a party to the Paris Convention and the Locarno Agreement and Designs governed by the Swedish Design Protection Act as well as the Council Regulation on Registered and Unregistered Designs. Protection under the Act lasts for renewable terms of one or several five year periods with a total, maximum, protection time of 25 years

    Initially, Sweden was regarded as a safe haven for internet users: internet privacy, piracy, etc. However, with all of the advancements and innovations, Sweden feels the need to increase its security in these areas. The reason for this is to limit illegal activity on and off the internet, decreasing corruption levels and ability to take advantage in Sweden.

    The situation with International Intellectual Property Protection is a delicate, yet imperative topic. IP, Intellectual Property, is vital to improving economies through the incorporation of medicines, trademarks, and art. IP rights and protections bring restrictions on what information can be accessed and distributed, however it assures security and reducing market shares from competing firms. On the other hand, taking a more open approach will increase the production of creative works without proper certification or licensing, allowing the release of illegitimate products and theft of foreign IP.

    Sweden continues to believe that protection is necessary in Intellectual property. Being a signatory to multiple IP conventions, Sweden’s stance remains firm, the protection of rights is essential. We believe information is a powerful tool, however, exposure to dangerous information can bring harmful consequences. Securing property rights decreases the probability of invalid information from being released. In effect, unlicensed information or products will not be approved by the Swedish government. In addition, this provides securing for the growing amount of technology companies: less corruption, falsification, and theft in the IP sector.

    Sweden stands with other governments to ensure equal protection and rights of Intellectual property. Appropriate ways to protect IP going forward from Sweden are:
    The continuation of the various EU intellectual property law.
    Urges nations who do not follow these similar conventions to adopt these policies.
    Work to support governments who do not have the guidelines set either through, incentivization, funding , or otherwise.
    Encourage all nations to adopt guidelines and fully support guidelines established by the WIPO, and substantiates the need for additional reports on such information.
    Sweden fully believes that if these guidelines are instituted all nations share a bright future as in regards to intellectual property.

    Research: https://www.export.gov/article?id=Sweden-Protection-of-Property-Rights http://www.wipo.int/wipolex/en/profile.jsp?code=SE

  • Gsoccer348
    Gsoccer348 November 15, 2017 Reply

    United Nations General Assembly Sixth Committee
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Republic of India
    Grant Charles Centner

    As new technologies arise and countries continue to develop, citizens of those countries begin to invent and create their own products. The rights of these inventors and the right to their own intellectual property must be protected and upheld. According to Patseer, a research firm, the U.S. created 17012 inventions in 2015, while India in second invented 12,134 products, these numbers are constantly increasing from year to year. Recent developments in human genetics have allowed scientists to sequence the human genome, and even patent naturally and artificially occurring human genome sequences. The United Nations needs to assess the danger of patenting human genomes, and whether or not it will be allowed. In the court case of Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. the Supreme Court of the United States of America has recently ruled that patenting naturally occurring human genomes is illegal. The UN must quickly decide and pass a resolution that gives no doubt in the mind of the world as to what the UN’s stance is on the issue.

    As a country on it’s way to becoming a center of innovation and industry, it is essential for Indian citizens to know that their intellectual property will be respected around the globe. Prime Minister Narendra Modi says, “I am personally convinced and want to assure you that India is committed to protect Intellectual Property Rights of all innovators and entrepreneurs.” The United Nations must recognize the right for manufacturers of pharmaceuticals to continue making commonplace and generic drugs. India has a large and growing pharmaceutical industry, if the UN were to allow patents for generic drugs it could damage the indian pharmaceutical industry and any future research or cures it could create. According to the IBEF (Indian Brand Equity Foundation) the indian pharmaceutical industry is expected to grow to become a $100 billion industry by 2025. If patents on generic and basic drugs are to be more heavily enforced the industry would lose $650 million, and could even cause global shortages of these drugs. Patents should be a defensive measure, not an offensive tool, companies such as Samsung and Apple have been making patents that stymie each others competition, the United Nations must address this.

    The Republic of India proposes that the United Nations should modify the TRIPS Agreement to address these issues of human genome patents, generic pharmaceutical drugs, and companies using patents to thwart competitors profits. The UN must loosen regulations of generic drugs, if the UN tightens regulations it will lead to a shortage of these incredibly important drugs. The United Nations must create more articulate resolutions in these main areas plaguing the world economy. The UN must also address the incredible brashness of allowing China to blatantly steal U.S. based intellectual property, and in so doing breaking several international treaties including the WIPO, WTO, and TRIPS Agreement. India has been working incredibly hard to protect their own intellectual property and that of other countries, but now the UN must help secure IP rights around the globe. A resolution that takes all of this into consideration will help grow the world economy while respecting intellectual property rights.

  • Sarah-Skaleski
    Sarah-Skaleski November 15, 2017 Reply

    November 13th, 2017
    SUBMITTED TO: Legal
    FROM: Namibia
    SUBJECT: Intellectual Property
    Sarah Skaleski

    Intellectual property (IP) relates to an idea or invention, that is the result of works of creativity and design and the ownership of such creative ideas. Intellectual property is the basis of innovation and improvement in many aspects of society. The country of Namibia credits intellectual property, for the country’s continued success as a successfully growing nation. IP provided incentives for Namibian civilians to develop new and improved ways to enhance the technology and industry in their societies. Without this, Namibia would not have been able to come so far and be as well developed and successful as they are today and have become in recent years.
    With this being said, Namibia wants to ensure that a fair balance can be found between the protection and limitations of IP and protection of consumer interests, such as incentive programs and the large existence of information, open for public knowledge. In 1991 Namibia joined the World Intellectual Property Organization, a convention created to mandate global IP. Namibia is a large supporter of WIPO and the values it was created upon, but would to revising sections to ensure the complete success of finding the balance between regulations and incentives, while staying in the legal bounds of all countries. Namibia stresses the importance of all nations to support IP incentive programs, especially for developing nations, to continue global innovation. Similarly, Namibia calls upon all global leaders to discuss a clear, and specific system of IP licensing and the consequences of nations who refuse to oblige to the standards presented. Namibia questions what regulations will be put in place for dealing the legislation side of IP. As well as what the right amount of limitations of IP is needed without taking away from the incentives that IP offers. Namibia also inquirers how IP license and ownership disputes can be resolved calmly and quickly, as to not lead to increased tension or violence between nations. What specific measures will be taken against countries that continue to ignore IP regulations?
    Namibia hopes a resolution will develop programs that promote the development and innovation of many industries for nations all over, by providing incentives, and IP education courses to inform the public of the workings of IP. Namibia also stresses the importance of creating a resolution that clearly addresses the topic of putting together and mandating a system that controls IP licensing and the ownership of IP works and ideas. A resolution is needed to sharpen the procedure of settling international IP disputes fairly and peacefully. As well as clearly stating the steps that will be taken when countries do not respect or gain the proper licenses for IP ideas. A resolution must clearly state the specific powers that WIPO is granted by all nations to deal with these issues, if and when they arise. One final issue that Namibia would like to see addressed in a resolution is, by what extent individual nations are able to incorporate their own beliefs on IP issues, for example, the debate on genetic modification in agriculture and IP, without going against WIPO regulations.
    Namibia it proud of the progress they have made, in integrating, managing, and developing IP into Namibian society. Namibia passed a bill called the Business and Intellectual Property Authority (BIPA) that addresses the challenges that owners of IP face. BIPA ensures that IP owners receive legal and economic credit for their work, BIPA also establishes easy access to the guidelines and registration of IP ownership. As a result of BIPA being passed Namibian innovation has flourished and helped pave the way for Namibia’s recent and continuous successes. Namibia hopes that other nations follow, this example in adopting policies similar to BIPA to promote innovation in all nations. In order for this to happen all nations must come together and discusses the steps that the international community, must take to succeed.
    The country of Namibia looks forward to discussing and developing resolutions with world leaders to promote and develop a global environment where all nations can excel and succeed in all areas of intellectual property.

    Sources

    http://ttatm.sarpam.net/wp-content/uploads/Intellectual-Property-Audit-Report-of-Namibia-for-workshop-2016.pdf

    http://www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/intproperty/489/wipo_pub_489.pdf

    http://ttatm.sarpam.net/wp-content/uploads/Intellectual-Property-Audit-Report-of-Namibia-for-workshop-2016.pdf

    http://www.modgear.net/glica17/hello-world-3/

  • Br481216
    Br481216 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Portugal
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Rights
    Delegate: Matthew Russell
    School: Williamston High School

    With humanity in the information age a certain kind of crime has become more and more prevalent that crime being cybercrime. When the theft of intellectual property is committed most of the time it is through the internet. This is because of the great ease criminals are able to steal intellectual property this is made easier by less developed countries in particular having few regulations or poorly enforced regulations on intellectual property rights and cybercrime. This is incredibly damaging as intellectual property has become a much greater commodity again as a result of the information age then it has in previous times. The theft of intellectual property that is allowed due to poor regulations that exist in some nations.
    Portugal has many laws in regard to intellectual property rights and is a part of several trade agreements such as GATT and TRIP. Portuguese legislation for the protection of intellectual property rights has been consistent with WTO rules and EU directives since 2004. Along with this Portugal also has a special intellectual property court specifically for intellectual property rights that has two judges. Along with this the ease and accessibility to register intellectual property in Portugal has made it easy for anyone to register properly their intellectual property making it harder for criminals to steal. Portugal has also participated in the eMAGE and eMARKS so that there can be no confusion with intellectual property rights even in countries that do not speak Portuguese
    Portugal suggest that all countries follow the guidelines set in place for the international community about intellectual. Along with this Portugal also suggest that countries should participate in many of the same programs as Portugal is in favor of a resolution that gives clear and concise regulations for the protection of intellectual property rights. Portugal would expect to see support from all developed nations but especially those in the EU and North America.

  • Ryanpep
    Ryanpep November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: Kazakhstan
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Delegate: Ryan Peplinski
    School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy

    Intellectual property rights are the rights of an owner to their idea. Intellectual rights are an important topic for Kazakhstan because as a developing nation starting new businesses is essential for the growth of our nation. It is also important for developed nations as well, because of the increase in technology and ideas of new business. The country of Kazakhstan believes that intellectual property rights need to be strengthened for the continuously growing economy.

    Currently we are working to improve the property rights for our nation. We have done much with IP rights enacting many laws from our legislature. We are also apart of an IP related treaty with Russian Federation, Ukraine, and Belarus called Agreement on the Establishment of the Common Economic Zone. We believe that IP rights are an important step for entering the market and protecting a company’s assets. Since our nation is in fact a CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) nation, the first person to file their property is the one with ownership. The Commonwealth of Independent States is a group of nations that coordinate trade, lawmaking, security, and finance. At the moment our nation is going through conflict in the our market with counterfeit goods. Law enforcement has numerously found products that are copies violating an owner’s in rights. However the a bigger problem is the copies that may endanger a consumer’s health. Kazakhstan would like to work with other nations on improving Intellectual Property rights. Our nation intends to work with all nations wanting to strengthen IP rights in hope for a better global economy.

  • Nweller1
    Nweller1 November 15, 2017 Reply

    United Nations General Assembly Sixth Committee
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Côte d’Ivoire
    Nathan Weller

    Intellectual property (IP) protection is placing patents on creative works, including medicines, trademarks, and art. IP protection is critical to fostering innovation. Without protection of ideas, businesses and individuals would not reap the full benefits of their inventions and would focus less on research and development. Protection of intellectual property (IP) rewards creators or owners of creative works for producing these works. Without IP protection, it is easy for one’s creative work to be stolen, leading to credit being given to another person. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is one of 16 specialized agencies of the United Nations. WIPO oversees international treaties governing IP protection. The WIPO currently has 186 member states that are part of the united nations. There are current 6 member states of the UN who are not part of WIPO– South Sudan, Federalist States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, The Solomon and Islands, and Palestine, who currently has observer status. The united nations must address the issue of whether to harmonize IP rights, loosen IP protections, settling on the status quo, or more strictly enforcing existing IP protection

    Intellectual Property is an issue in Côte d’Ivoire, a developing country.The Ivorian Civil Code protects Intellectual Property (IP) rights; however, protection of intellectual property rights in Côte d’Ivoire is weak and the GOCI has limited resources for IP protection. Côte d’Ivoire has a law on mandatory registration of commercial names. Côte d’Ivoire believes that IP laws heavily favor first-world countries and stifle development and economic growth within developing countries. Côte d’Ivoire is a member of WIPO, and have signed the TRIPS agreement, which sets a fair playing field for companies operating across national borders. Côte d’Ivoire is also part of the African Intellectual Property Organization, and is signatory to the Paris Convention for the Protection of Intellectual Property. Côte d’Ivoire, due to lack of substantial funds, has had slight problems related to IP rights in the past, although it is not as prominent of an issue today.

    Côte d’Ivoire opposes efforts to limit competitiveness of companies within third-world countries. Côte d’Ivoire does see strict IP laws as a threat to third-world countries, as they give most of the power to first-world corporations. Côte d’Ivoire, in order to prevent developed countries from gaining too much power, would like to see the severity of IP laws be limited, therefore giving developing countries like itself a greater chance in competitions for IP rights. Côte d’Ivoire, due to the fact that existing IP laws give the power to larger, first-world countries, encourages the united nations to loosen existing IP protections, to make it more equal for the smaller countries, such as itself, in issues revolving around IP rights.

  • KamlewisFHPS
    KamlewisFHPS November 15, 2017 Reply

    International Intellectual Property Protection Committee
    Sharing and Legitimizing of Intellectual Property Protection
    Honduras
    Kameron Lewis

    The International Intellectual Property Protection in The UN has begun in an organization called “World Intellectual Property Organization” or WIPO for short. My country in specific has began to finalize all the laws on it. They already have 1 basic Constitutional right, 2 main laws, and several laws relating to it. Laws need to be put into place as soon as possible; They can encourage countries to share information, proceeding their research further. Hence making an overall stronger wealth of efficiency among fellow countries.

    This topic is not an apparent issue in my country, but we do hope to expand our horizons. We feel sharing information among countries would be quite beneficial to every country including our own. Some laws have been set into place by the UN and other countries about what can be claimed and what not, but Honduras hopes to advance the base knowledge given to every country. We have already begun to expand and share our information with the United States back in 2016. We hope to continue and prosper with other countries willing to take the leap to build a better future.

    If you are willing to join Honduras and other countries in progressing medical, economical and many other areas we hope to pass laws loosening the abilities to patent so many things and make them available to every country willing to sign. After these events occur we hope to improve the general health of the world and get a well known based on information.

  • Ristaue1
    Ristaue1 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Submitted To: UNGA Sixth Committee (Legal)
    From: The Russian Federation
    Subject: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Delegate: Emma Ristau
    School: Royal Oak High School

    The Russian Federation, as a signatory to over 27 international IPR agreements, recognizes the integral facilitatory role intellectual property protections have in dynamic technological development. As research and development expands, Russia accepts that international IP law must, too. For nearly the past 40 years, Russia has been working to evolve its own IP laws in tandem with the changing technological landscape, culminating in the establishment of Russia’s specialized IP Court in 2011.
    Russia stresses that the work done here in the Sixth Committee, and in any UN committee, must promote nondiscrimination, inclusivity, and mutual benefit for all parties. We must consider the threshold at which IP framework is too strict and punitive for mutual benefit to be realized to its greatest extent. What made the TRIPs agreement so revolutionary, after all, was its comprehensive, enforceable nature struck a balance with its broad-based structure. IPRs can be worthwhile mechanisms for sustainable development and a more transparent multilateral trade system, but when IP protections on an international scale are tightened too far, IPRs can detract from inclusive development. An unscrupulous approach to international IPR can have protectionistic effects, destroying the very multilateralism we seek to promote.
    On the whole, the international community is rapidly developing technologically, but we cannot forget that each country has a distinct technological narrative. For developing nations, stronger IPRs have not been proven to spur invention nor do IPRs automatically guarantee a more favorable investment climate. In fact, for those agriculture-based developing nations, stricter and more expansive IPRs can inhibit further scientific discovery. More comprehensive IPRs for plants and animals disrupt flows of genetic resources and, with developing nations’ R&D capacities being mostly agricultural, such a disruption could block development. The Legal Committee must recognize these kinds of nuances in innovation narratives around the world if international IP protection is to be truly inclusive.
    The Russian Federation is constantly working to match a rapidly moving world with appropriate, internationally lawful IPRs. The Sixth Committee’s work regarding IP must reflect an understanding of different innovation contexts and promote open, inclusive, and sustainable development. Russia cannot merely suggest a “loosening” or “strengthening” of IP law, as there are a number of complexities to account for. We look forward to working with the Legal Committee to direct the global IP trajectory toward a more mutually beneficial, development-oriented state.

  • Bwozniak27
    Bwozniak27 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Indonesia
    Ben Wozniak

    Intellectual Property protection is quickly becoming more and more important in our modern global economy. With new technologies arising, IP protection is essential to protect creative works and avoid exploitation. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) was created to oversee global IP protection. This agency, however, has had trouble standardizing laws and enforcement of Intellectual Property fraud. With agreements such as the Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS) or the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), the WIPO has attempted to establish specific boundaries or IP. These agreements, especially ACTA, has caused controversy with its aggressive approach to IP protection.

    Indonesia is part of the World Intellectual Property Organization and has also sanctioned the TRIPS Agreement. As a semi-developing country, we recognize the need for IP protection to protect creative works to grow our economy. Because we are not fully developed, our enforcement is loose which has allowed an estimated 18 million copies of pirated movies, songs, etc…

    Indonesia recommends that the United Nations forms a new IP Trade Agreement to standardize enforcement of Intellectual Property crime on a global level. Doing this will help countries, such as us, protect Intellectual Property to the fullest extend. In order to encourage creative works, IP protection is essential and standardizing it on an international level will help the global economy.

    • Spdziuba
      Spdziuba November 15, 2017 Reply

      Legal
      International Intellectual Property Protection
      Malaysia
      Spencer John Dziuba

      The Paris and Berne Conventions during the 19th century formed the base of international IP protection in the 21st century. Established by the Berne convention, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a subcategory of the World Trade Organization (WTO), specializes in IP rights. WIPO passed the World Intelectual Property Copyright Treaty in 2002 which extends IP protections to digital works and forbids circumventing Digital Rights Management (DRM) systems. In April 2007, the Malaysian Government launched the National Intellectual Property Policy (NIPP), announcing to the world its intention to harness intellectual property (IP) as a new engine of growth to enhance the country’s economic and social prosperity. The NIPP sets the policies and directions to be taken by all stakeholders associated with IP activities and also strengthens the IP enforcement system. Throughout the world, there have been disputes between countries over stealing IP rights, to create cheaper goods, and bypassing the licensing of creative works.

      Malaysia has recently created the National Intellectual Property Policy (NIPP) which is meant to encourage economic growth by strengthening the IP rights of malaysian businesses. Malaysia is a member of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) and a signatory to the Paris Convention and Berne Convention which govern these intellectual property rights.In addition, Malaysia also signed the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) signed under the auspices of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) which sets down minimum standards for the regulation by national governments. Malaysia provides adequate protection to both local and foreign investors. Malaysia’s intellectual property laws are in conformance with international standards and have been reviewed by the TRIPs Council periodically. Domestically, Malaysian IP protection is controlled by MyIPO or the Malaysian Intellectual Property Corporation. Malaysia ranks second in Asean and 19th in the world in terms of intellectual property (IP) protection for countries assessed in the latest US Chamber International IP Index.

      Malaysia recommends the strengthening of IP rights on an international level through WIPO and WTO. Malaysia also recommends the unifying of national and domestic Intellectual Property in order to prevent disputes over copyrights and patents. Malaysia also firmly believes that protecting IP rights and safeguarding innovation is key to making Malaysia more attractive to foreign investors. The strengthening of IP rights will also prevent counterfeits that can be more easily manufactured and consumers are more likely to end up buying and consuming these products.

  • Chloewendlandt
    Chloewendlandt November 15, 2017 Reply

    Country: France
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property
    Delegate: Chloe Wendlandt
    School: Forest Hills Central High School

    Intellectual Property allows individuals to place ownership on inventions, music, art, and other ideas that may be deemed intangible. This includes the right to copyrights, patents, and trademarks that legally protect these ideas and can impose punishments if these works are plagiarized.

    France strongly believes in the right to patents and the right to intellectual property, and it has an Intellectual Property Code in place. The IPC protects patents and trademarks as industrial property while copyrights protect artistic and literary works. France’s IPC protects literary and artistic creations, audio and music, computer works and software programs, and photographic work under copyrights. Under the IPC, authors of intellectual property are given moral and patrimonial rights; moral rights yield the creator respect and recognition during and after life, and patrimonial rights allow the creator to sell his or her work for financial purposes for up to 70 years after life. In addition, France files a relatively small amount of copyrights in order for them to be extremely protective.

    The president of France, Emmanuel Macron, has mentioned that “Europe had failed to protect its workers and its intellectual property.” In response, France would like to work with not only European countries, but every country in the Legal Committee to create stronger intellectual property laws to create a comprehensive resolution paper that accommodates creators and protects their ideas. In effect, creative individuals will contribute to a more diverse and competitive market for works of art, literature, music, and other matters of the sort.

  • Jonathanandrews
    Jonathanandrews November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    Rwanda
    Jonathan Andrews
    International intellectual property protection

    Intellectual property laws protect original works and designs. These laws exist on both a national and a global scale. These rights help provide a better economy for countries. While there are global laws already in place that are monitored by the WIPO, not all designs are protected under these laws. If stronger IP laws are not put on place then it will make piracy and other forms of IP theft easier for the criminals. If the laws are not strengthened than credit for a design may be given to a thief from another country which will hurt the economy of the country the idea actually came out of. Rwanda believes that there should be more laws signed into law to cover things that are not addressed in the current laws.

    Rwanda is a signatory of several WIPO laws and treaties. We are also a member of the ARIPO which protects intellectual property between several other African nations and ourselves. The laws and treaties that we have signed serve to protect the rights of our citizens and to protect our economy. Without these laws we would be vulnerable to IP theft. There are still instances of things that are currently not protected under these laws that need to be added.

    We are requesting that more laws are passed to further protect IP that is not currently covered in the existing laws and treaties. We are ready and willing to work with any nation in order to write IP laws with stronger guidelines, or to revise the existing ones in order to further protect our citizens.

  • Creitenour
    Creitenour November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International intellectual property protection
    Chile
    Cooper Reitenour

    International intellectual Property protection (IP) is the rewarding for creative work such as patents. The IP works to protect creative ideas from being taken by other people. The world intellectual property organization or though WIPO is a specialized agency for the UN these are the people that oversee the international treaties governing IP protection. The barne convention is for copyright protection. So far 174 out of 192 countries have ratified the berne convention. All members of the WIPO have signed the trips agreement the trip this agreement is set in place to have fair playing field for operators across national borders. The international incorrect property protection allows you to sue a company if they take your ideas. Many countries use this so you can make it a crime to steal other peoples creative ideas such as creative works, medicines, trademarks art, and inventions. Together countries are working to make IP protections more strict by enforcing them more.

    Chile supports the international intellectual property protection. Although chili has not expanded to worldwide international intellectual property protection they have for southern America. Truly believes that it is a crime to take creative ideas from other people and use them as yourself. Chili would like to punish anybody who takes others ideas under the international intellectual property protection. Other countries would like to persuade chili into being a worldwide leader of international intellectual property protection. so far chili has worked with some countries including the US out of South America.

    Chili looks forward to talking to the other countries that support the WIPO and see their text on why they ratified The Berne convention. Chili also looks forward to those who did not ratify the Berne convention to see their takes on this and why they did not ratify it.

  • BennyFink
    BennyFink November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Saudi Arabia
    Benjamin Finkelstein

    Over the last decade, Saudi Arabia has worked on developing comprehensive laws protecting intellectual property rights in the Arab Region. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has invested time to conform to the WTO (World Trade Organization) agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights. Since the early 2000s, The Kingdom has been committed to imposing stricter penalties on copyright violators. In 2010, the Ministry of Culture cited its first ever copyright violation in lieu of recently adopting the Intellectual Property Owners Association Patent Cooperation Treaty. Continuing efforts have reinforced the protection of specific points of interest in intellectual property.

    In late 2016, the Kingdom seized 41 million counterfeit goods which amassed to $83 million. Under the Islamic ruling “fatwa,” Saudi Arabia forbids software piracy. The delegation of Saudi Arabia recognizes the need for increased action against the illegal solicitation of copyrighted and trademarked items and intends to pursue a resolution to halt the black market trafficking of counterfeit goods in the Middle East.

    Saudi Arabia seeks to promote business trade among Arab Nations, and also among South American countries in an effort to support overall relations. The introduction of illegally manufactured and counterfeited goods into the surrounding marketplaces imposes a threat to these relations. As such, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia believes in protecting the integrity of individual intellectual property in order to promote the continuing introduction of innovative products into the market.

    Saudi Arabia supports legislation to guard against the theft of intellectual property, both foreign and domestic. The Kingdom hopes to encourage economic development and foreign relations through the protection of intellectual materials and looks forward to continuing involvement in the World Intellectual Property Organization and WTO.

  • Bgr914
    Bgr914 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Israel
    Benjamin Raterink

    Intellectual property is, or can be, any numerous forms of creation or work that have been produced by the human mind. This can be any variety of items such as: names, images, literary pieces, symbols, or artistic works that are released to the general global-public. The issues related to Intellectual Property (IP) started to take relevance in the modern world when the Paris Convention of 1883 and the Berne Convention of 1893 formed together to make up the ‘United International Bureaux for the Protection of IP’. This group released few works and settled disputes which related to IP protection, but they were later succeeded by the ‘World Intellectual Property Organisation’ (WIPO), who is the current United Nations (UN) leader and group to handle IP. The UN’s current works, aside from the WIPO Convention treaty and the publications by the WIPO, have been treaties such as the Marrakesh treaty. The government of Israel has signed to the WIPO Convention and applauds to the assembly for their works on the IP issue. However, with the growing intensity of the topic, the country of Israel supports the future works of the WIPO and the required regulations or protection systems that will be implemented for the benefit of the global population and its intellectual property.

    The debate for the protection of Intellectual Property within Israel began with Biblical texts due to the conflicting religions which exist in the country. With the modernization of the world, Israel has shifted its aim from religious ideologies to pharmaceuticals. The medicinal field of Israel has increased exponentially and has become a wondrous source of income for the country, but the issue of IP protection has remained consistent. Without the protection of IP for the government research facilities in Israel, the country will be negatively hurt. Its for this reason that the state of Israel has created roughly 78 different texts in response to the issues of the protection of IP. These texts are laws or regulations that the government has placed in order to provide improved security of intellectual property. These texts consist of items within the constitution, monopoly laws which have been instituted, and laws or regulations which relate to the matter of IP. However, the main concern of Intellectual Property for the Israeli government is pharmaceuticals, genetic research, and other medicinal forms; the laws instituted are in place to protect every citizen equally and provide them with the claim to their material of creative work: monopoly laws.

    The state of Israel strenuously calls for the Legal committee to reevaluate the definition of Intellectual Property and what is encompassed by the definition by clearly stating what applies and to develop a comprehensive monopoly protection system of Intellectual Property such as those used in Israel. The state of Israel additionally mentions a few current works from the WTO and the WIPO such as: the TRIPS Agreement, the Madrid System, and the Hague Agreement Concerning the Registration of Industrial Designs (1925) as points that the UN has taken effort to remedy the issues related to the Protection of Intellectual Property. However, these treaties are vague and require subsidiary action within nations’ borders to become more effective. Other member-states to the WIPO should advocate for monopoly laws and regulations in result that strict and clear guidelines will be built to control intellectual property within a country’s borders. The redefining of the definition for Intellectual Property should comprise of all articles which are protected and considered to be IP. To Israel, articles which are considered to be IP are: written musical works, online musical works, broadcasts, any literary works which are published and not published, any patent and non-patent designs or inventions, items considered public domain, branding materials, and items of artistic design. The nation of Israel sees Intellectual Property as the property, and right to protect such commodities, as belonging to every human as a natural right which should justifiably be stated within a comprehensible resolution and system which can uphold that right.

  • Asantos
    Asantos November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: Re-evaluating the Chemical Weapons
    Country: South Korea

    Chemical weapons are a huge problem around the world and many people have died because of them. The UN took a step forward to get a hold of this problem by creating the CWC. Following this, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons was made and as of 2016 has worked to destroy 90% of known chemical stockpiles. There was a large progression in both the CWC and the OPCW until recently when North Korea and multiple other countries have begun amassing large stockpiles of nerve agents. Many countries can get away with continually making certain chemical weapons as the definition of a chemical weapon was vague and they could technically continue to make it for commercial and non-lethal reasons. BWC was also created to control biological processes that can have a hold of toxic compounds; however the problem is getting worse and the definition of chemical weapon needs to be more specific as to make these organizations be more proactive toward avoiding chemical warfare without interfering with the use of chemicals for non destructive purposes.
    The Republic of Korea believes that these three organizations are not doing enough as to keep people safe from chemical weapons. More rules and regulations should made so as to avoid the easy production of dangerous weapons in multiple countries like North Korea. We have received constant death threats from North Korea and the amount of weapons they have a hold of is deadly. We remind the international community that North Korea serious threat to not just us, but the world and we urge them to accede to the CWC. The Republic Of Korea is willing to contribute to any resolution dealing with the denuclearization of North Korea.

  • Asantos
    Asantos November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Country: South Korea

    All people have the right to create artwork, films, medicines, etc. and they have the right to protect their ownership of it. Protecting intellectual property is important to further promote the need for new creations which in turn spurs economic growth. Multiple organizations have been made to protect these rights and not allow things like copyright. For example, WIPO and ACTA. ACTA was signed in 2011, though has not gone into effect because of protests. Also, WTO has signed the TRIPS agreement allowing things to be fair for all companies operating across national borders. Recently, new technology has caused IP protection to be looked at in a new perspective and there are multiple conflicts as to how far WIPO and ACTA should go. People fear that their internet privacy would be violated and others believe that websites shouldn’t be allowed to only let information be seen by certain people.
    As the Republic of Korea, we believe that it is right to protect to rights of people and their intellectual property. Through KIPO, we ensure that new ideas and creations will be patented first and we follow the “first to file” rule for trade marks. We joined WIPO and fully support the idea of new businesses which bring more jobs and national competitiveness. We also want to discourage piracy so that all products are original. The intellectual property program really influences not only economic development in a good way but also allows new inventions and creations to flourish.
    Our goals:
    a) Build a strong IPR protection system
    b) Strengthen the capacity of IP facilitation

  • JoshuaOsgood
    JoshuaOsgood November 15, 2017 Reply

    Re-Evaluating the Chemical Weapons Convention
    Arab Republic of Egypt
    The Roeper School
    Joshua Osgood

    Delegates, it is the role of a nation to protect its people. The people of a nation create, shape, and drive a nation. Therefore Egypt believes that in order to protect the Egytian people, Egypt can not sign the 1997 United Nation Chemical Weapons Convention. With the political turmoil caused by both hostilities between nations and insurgent terrorist forces, Egypt believes that the saifty of its people would be undermined by signing the Chemical weapons convention.

    Egypt instead would ask the delegates to procied slowly and cautiously. To add to this instability, the constant pressure of insugent groupe, ISIS, poses a great threat to the Egyptian people. Even as Egypt applies great military force against ISIS, the Egytian people are far from safe. If the critical situation were to arise in which ISIS were to gain chemical weapons of it’s own, Egypt believes that the ablility to own chemical weapons woudl garentee an aditional layer of security for its own people. Unless the terrorist group ISIS is removed, as well as all other terrorist groups, from the region of Africa and and Asia in which they are imbedded, Egypt feels that it can not give up chemical weapons capability.

    To conclude, Egypt believes that this the current Chemical Weapons Convention can not be signed, unless the safety of the Egyptian people can be guaranteed. Until the substantial threats of terrorist groups has subsided, Egypt will not give up chemical weapons capabilities.

  • AGR911
    AGR911 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal Committee
    International Intellectual Property Protections
    Republic of Turkey
    Alan Garrett Raterink

    The protection of intellectual property has proven to be a perplexing issue across international borders, and emerging technologies in more advanced nations and current political discourses continue to challenge the approach to international IP protection. This issue is pertinent to Turkey due to the government’s inability to establish a comprehensive and robust copyright, patent, trademarks, and industrial designs. Turkey has made efforts to provide protection of intellectual property in the form of decrees, but as the Turkish constitution states that fundamental rights can only be taken by law, several of our decrees have been deemed unconstitutional. This has raised alarm in Turkey over how to properly protect creative works of its citizens.

    Despite these drawbacks to the current approach, Turkey is in the process of introducing a coherent and lawful method to protect intellectual property, including, but not limited to, international versus Turkish exhaustion, clearer separation of grounds for cancellation and revocation, and loss of rights due to remaining silent, among other things to meet requirements of EU standards. Efforts to improve IP protections within our borders were first put into place when Turkey, being part of the European Union, tried to adhere to EU standards and regulations under the European Union-Turkey Customs Union (“Turkey”). Turkey has made an effort to further the IP system in the digital age by joining the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), which deals with the protection of works and the rights of their authors in the digital environment, pertaining to computer programs and compilations of data or other material. Since Turkey is a member of the World Trade Organization, the Turkish government also became a part of the TRIPS agreement in 1995 (“World”). The TRIPS Agreement is often referred to as a Berne and Paris-plus agreement because it first requirers that the substantive parts of the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property (Paris Convention) and the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (Berne Convention) are adhered to in their most recent forms. Except for moral rights in the Berne Convention, all other provisions in the two conventions are adhered to and referenced in the TRIPS agreement (“Overview”). The most comprehensive law in place within Turkish borders is Law No. 6769 of December 22, 2016, on Industrial Property (“Turkey – Law”).

    Considering the tremendous progress made by the Turkish government in eliminating unconstitutional laws and adhering to more mainstream international standards, such as those in the EU, Turkey recommends that other nations simplify their internal IP protections as an initial step toward preparing for international compliance on a grander scale, whether it be the EU, or larger like the UN. Turkey, being part of over 70 international treaties regarding IP protections, believes that enforcement and dispute settlement would be dramatically simplified, assuming new, more comprehensive treaties that covered larger swaths of goods, services, and creative works were ratified. The new treaties should reference old ones, using only the necessary parts, and add new fields for emerging areas of IP for additional “future-proofing”. Much like how the simplification of the Turkish IP system made aligning with the European Union-Turkey Customs Union nearly seamless, simplification and consolidation of international treaties should be a top priority of this committee. Within these new treaties, Turkey specifically suggests and requests that as part of the simplification, belligerent nations who subsidize, or otherwise create an already-patented creative work, must pay the originator of the creative work instead of subsidizing unlawful actions in their own nations in an effort to compensate those whose rights are being infringed upon.

    Sources:
    McKenzie, Barker. “Turkey Enters a New Era for Protection of Intellectual Property Rights.” Lexology, Globe Business Media Group, 22 Apr. 2016, http://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=6c3749be-210b-48da-a2ec-ed7799a31f6b.

    “Turkey and the WTO.” WTO | Turkey – Member Information, World Trade Organization, http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/countries_e/turkey_e.htm.

    “Overview: the TRIPS Agreement.” WTO | Intellectual Property – Overview of TRIPS Agreement, World Trade Organization, http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/trips_e/intel2_e.htm.

    “Turkey – Law No. 6769 of December 22, 2016, on Industrial Property.” Turkey: Law No. 6769 of December 22, 2016, on Industrial Property, World Intellectual Property Organization, http://www.wipo.int/wipolex/en/details.jsp?id=16609.

  • Rachel_K12300
    Rachel_K12300 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Peru
    Rachel Klomparens
    In the 19th century the Paris and Berne Convention created a foundation for the international protection of IP (Intellectual Property). This is a vital step to the growth of economies. Intellectual property laws like copyright and trademark are vital in order to protect physical and intellectual property. IP has been protected in Peru since 1994. Peru’s enforcement of laws has been weak and Peru and believes that it protection should continue to increase.
    Peru’s laws agree with those of the TRIPS agreement. Peru focuses on laws against counterfeit scientific and medicinal products In 2011 Peru passed a law that criminalized the sale of counterfeit medicines. Peru also provides similar protections to U.S companies due to the U.S-Peru Trade Agreement. Peru is also a member of the WIPO, WTO and TRIPS, and has joined new PPH’s in order to continue to grow protection for intellectual property.

  • avatar image
    Carter Wade November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal Affairs (UNOLA)
    Topic Area 1: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Country: Columbia
    Delegate: Mr. Carter Wade

    Fellow Delegates and Honourable Chair,
    It is with intellectual anticipation that I stand before you today to form an international consensus on the future of intellectual property protection, especially in the international field. Intellectual property law is, in short, an agreement between society and producers of new ideas to grant the inventor sole rights to produce and profit from their idea or invention. This represents a temporary, government-sanctioned monopoly. The goal of intellectual property protection is to encourage innovation in the industry, marketing, or even creative works. A little-known fact about intellectual property law is that these protections are not just to reward success, but also to reward failure. The protection of intellectual property encourages developers of new products to push past, not one, not two, but tens of failures or even more by ensuring that the rewards for one success are so grand that researchers, designers, engineers, and scientists are pushed through long strings of failed ideas and prototypes to the one piece that sticks.
    Columbia has long been partnered with foreign nations in the realm of IP regulations. We have been party to the United States of America Free Trade Agreements, which include chapter sixteen specifically pertaining to international intellectual property law. The agreements themselves are based on the US system of IP protection, which in turn had been changed to better correspond to the IP system in the European Union under former President Barrack Obama. These patterns of reflecting policy of other nations for simpler coexistence around the globe, while retaining some key differences to reflect local phenomena and culture, demonstrate to the people of Columbia that small modifications to national IP protection, such as specific durations, fair use, and the like, to better reflect a global consensus and encouraging the recognition of patents, trademarks, and copyrights filed in other nations as valid elsewhere in the world represents all of the most encompassing, with the whole world in agreement; the easiest to implement, for all changes to be made occur at the national level; and the most permanent, as its reliance on fluidity of consensus among nations will allow adaptations to future society and culture, solution to the global integration of intellectual property protection at an international level.

  • Petersage
    Petersage November 15, 2017 Reply

    There are many creative products and medias such as drugs, literature, and art that make up a significant part of the world’s largest economies. To incentivize the creation of these products and medias, many countries have implemented protection for intellectual property (IP). The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) oversees international agreements about intellectual property. Switzerland’s position on intellectual property protection is relaxed. According to the Switzerland Climate Investment Statement 2015, Swiss authorities do not effectively enforce copyright laws, particularly online. As a result, Switzerland has become a hub for global piracy. In 2010, the Swiss High Court ruled that Internet Protocol addresses must be protected. Subsequently, they can not be used to prosecute those who break copyright laws. The European Union claims that Switzerland is the largest importer of counterfeit drugs into it’s countries.

    Disagreements on how IP laws should be enforced exist, and need to be resolved. Switzerland allows for anything to be downloaded from foreign websites without prosecution. Other members of the UN call for stricter IP protection and enforcement of copyright laws. Because of piracy’s commonality within it’s borders, Switzerland, along with other countries, is being scrutinized by governments whose peoples’ creative works are being pirated there. Advancements in technology have made it much more difficult for law enforcement to prosecute or even stop those who infringe upon copyright law.

    Finding a solution that protects intellectual property internationally will prove to be very difficult. Some governments wish to have strict enforcements on all intellectual property, while others such as Switzerland allow for the download of many copyrighted works. Switzerland would not be content to sign a treaty forcing them to prosecute people for downloading copyrighted works, as the practice is widespread throughout their country. It would be impractical and expensive to prosecute every person who infringed copyright law. A practical solution would be to set policy that enforces the prohibition of production and trade of counterfeit goods, as well as the upload of copyrighted material. These are proposals that Switzerland and other members of the UN would largely agree on, and be able to enforce.

  • avatar image
    Hannah Kos November 15, 2017 Reply

    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Country: Azerbaijan

    Relatively speaking, Azerbaijan is a new country in regards to a political stance. Having separated from the Soviet Union in 1922, we have had very little energy to spend on such an insignificant topic such as International Intellectual Property Protection when we have other issues to talk about such as just taking a stance in the UN and deciding how we feel on issues such as nuclear considering recent events and our close proximity to Russia.
    That being said, Azerbaijan has had small moments to focus on things such as copyright and the legality behind so. An example of such would be our decision to attempt to “patent breakfast.” Azerbaijan did this as a way to control what hotels were serving as the European Games happened in June of 2015. This was just a second step in government control as we feel controling news and journalistic content is most beneficial to our people. So, in the end, Azerbaijan is using this as a way to control what our people are seeing– making sure they are only seeing national, government approved news and what not.
    Overall, Azerbaijan’s stance on the international side is fairly non-existent. However, we are using copyright and patenting to our own advantage internally. While not a current problem with more highly significant things going on, we could see others having issues with this eventually. But, Azerbaijan is willing to meet that battle when it comes down to it because of how important it is to us.

  • Annelise2002
    Annelise2002 November 15, 2017 Reply

    Spain- International Intellectual Property Protection Annelise Ivanescu

    Fellow Delegates,
    Spain has tried to enforce intellectual property protection on the judicial and administrative levels, but, piracy continues to be a significant issue. We have ratified the World Intellectual Property Organization’s (WIPO) Copyright Treaty, which protects the rights and work of digital authors, published a new patent law in 2015, and ordered multiple high impact raids to effectively stop the sale of counterfeit goods in 2016. Our efforts have merely delayed the inevitable piracy.

    Our country has put in a constant and strenuous effort to strengthen the structure for Intellectual Property Rights Protection. Which has allowed us to form a good legal standing and strong criminal procedures to address IPR violations. We have passed legislation for the EU Copyright Directive, which has made internet treaties part of Spanish law. In recent years, digital piracy has become higher and we have had complaints from right holders.

    We have successfully maintained enforcement of trademark laws and rights. Spain has achieved this by implementing a Trademark law (2001-02) which allows the Spanish Office of Patents and Trademarks oversee protection of trademarks. Counterfeit items are now destroyed as soon as a official report has been made, unless asked otherwise by a judge.

    Spain has taken many actions to prevent Intellectual Property theft, we urge other countries to do the same. We hope to find a way to cease involvement in such acts, and ask that other countries help accomplish this goal.

  • JoshuaOsgood
    JoshuaOsgood November 16, 2017 Reply

    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Arab Republic of Egypt
    The Roeper School
    Joshua Osgood

    Delegates, as all of us know, international intellectual property is crucial to the current world economy. Each idea, invention, or design brings the world forward to a brighter future. Therefore, Egypt recognises that it is imperative to protect the intellectual rights to these properties.

    Unfortunately, due to the recent reconstruction of the Egyptian government and the violent insurgency of the self-proclaimed Islamic State and other terrorist organizations, Egypt has not had the time and resources to shore up protections for intellectual property. There is a rampant black market for false consumer goods, many of which have been shown to have adverse effects. Currently the laws and resources used to regulate the information and technology industry are insufficient. This has lead to the growing problem of internet piracy regarding intellectual property related products and services. This problem has only grown as use of the internet has expanded in Egypt, now with over fifty million users.

    To solve this problem, Egypt calls for a global coalition on all Intellectual Property. This coalition should define and regulate protections for intellectual property as well as provide resources, monetary aid and advice to nations struggling with intellectual property violations. This monetary aid would be used to fund government efforts and programs directed at combating intellectual property violations. This coalition would provide developing nations with the ability to advance their position in the world economy, as well as protect the intellectual property of individuals in other nations.

    To conclude, a global agreement should be formed with the intent to regulate intellectual property and provide aid to developing nations. Without this, nations such as Egypt would have extreme difficulty protecting intellectual property.

  • Spdziuba
    Spdziuba November 16, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Malaysia
    Spencer John Dziuba

    The Paris and Berne Conventions during the 19th century formed the base of international IP protection in the 21st century. Established by the Berne convention, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a subcategory of the World Trade Organization (WTO), specializes in IP rights. WIPO passed the World Intelectual Property Copyright Treaty in 2002 which extends IP protections to digital works and forbids circumventing Digital Rights Management (DRM) systems. In April 2007, the Malaysian Government launched the National Intellectual Property Policy (NIPP), announcing to the world its intention to harness intellectual property (IP) as a new engine of growth to enhance the country’s economic and social prosperity. The NIPP sets the policies and directions to be taken by all stakeholders associated with IP activities and also strengthens the IP enforcement system. Throughout the world, there have been disputes between countries over stealing IP rights, to create cheaper goods, and bypassing the licensing of creative works.

    Malaysia has recently created the National Intellectual Property Policy (NIPP) which is meant to encourage economic growth by strengthening the IP rights of malaysian businesses. Malaysia is a member of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) and a signatory to the Paris Convention and Berne Convention which govern these intellectual property rights.In addition, Malaysia also signed the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) signed under the auspices of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) which sets down minimum standards for the regulation by national governments. Malaysia provides adequate protection to both local and foreign investors. Malaysia’s intellectual property laws are in conformance with international standards and have been reviewed by the TRIPs Council periodically. Domestically, Malaysian IP protection is controlled by MyIPO or the Malaysian Intellectual Property Corporation. Malaysia ranks second in Asean and 19th in the world in terms of intellectual property (IP) protection for countries assessed in the latest US Chamber International IP Index.

    Malaysia recommends the strengthening of IP rights on an international level through WIPO and WTO. Malaysia also recommends the unifying of national and domestic Intellectual Property in order to prevent disputes over copyrights and patents. Malaysia also firmly believes that protecting IP rights and safeguarding innovation is key to making Malaysia more attractive to foreign investors. The strengthening of IP rights will also prevent counterfeits that can be more easily manufactured and consumers are more likely to end up buying and consuming these products.

  • Cboston
    Cboston November 16, 2017 Reply

    Estonia
    Corrionna Boston
    Grand Blanc High School
    GA-Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection

    Intellectual Property includes the craftswork of arts; including books, movies, medicine, and trademarks are the frameworks of a economy. Businesses in developed countries have accused developing countries of violations of Intellectual Property (IP). In an effort to protect the property of those that created it. The Berne Convention also known as the Paris and Bern Convention established a World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO); an international organization that create and regulate treaties involving the IP within the nations. Proposals attempted included the TRIPS agreement signed by the World Trade Organization, that attempted to provide and protect the Intellectual Properties of companies operating overseas. Then, later in 2002 the Copyright Act protecting digital works and DRM systems. Likewise, an effort for even more security WIPO signed the Anti- Counterfeiting Trade agreement, but in the efforts to coordinate this agreement the freedom of speech and privacy is compromised. Obviously, resulting in it not being enforced. Furthermore, with the emerging there is so only enough ways to protect IP as the influences of technology and the political debate surrounding Intellectual Property challenge those reforms.

    Estonia, a country part of the Berne Convention, WIPO, TRIPS, Rome Convention, and the Geneva Convention fully cooperates with the EU directives granting protection to artists including: authors, performing artists, record producers, broadcasting, etc.(export.gov para. 5) Tracks and reports on the periodical seizures of counterfeit goods. However, in the past a step towards IP protection involved the case of AS Balteco v AS Neoqi, two companies with similar products that employed the same employees but not written patent. The significance of this case showed the importance of patents, or IPR reform. (Kelli pp. 109 para. 5) With all of this in mind, Estonia views this as a major issue as to avoid the continuation this issue Estonia has prosecuted IPR violations by fines, community service, custodial arrest, imprisonment, compensation for rights holder, civil enforcement, and/or prevent the release of infringed goods. (Anohin el al. para. 18)

    As Estonia legal committee, Estonia proposes several solutions. The first, is focusing more the IP protections’ already enforced. As focusing more on the current ones can allow you to see what exactly areas of property need protection and what can be included in it as things in the world progress. Secondly, the all countries could agree on Intellectual property for all. In order, to prevent those with loss IP in developed countries from getting their property remade and resold.

  • Diget77
    Diget77 November 16, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    The United Arab Emirates
    Ashley Diget

    The Paris and Berne Conventions during the 19th century formed the base of international IP protection in the 21st century. Established by the Berne convention, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a subcategory of the World Trade Organization (WTO), specializes in IP rights. Throughout the world, there have been disputes between countries over stealing IP rights, to create cheaper goods, and bypassing the licensing of creative works.
    The United Arad Emirates is in full support of protecting the Intellectual properties. UAE is part of the WIPO joined in 1974. We have signed the Paris Convention, Patent Cooperation Treaty, Rome Convention, Beijing Treaty on Audiovisual Performances, Berne Convention, Marrakesh VIP Treaty, WIPO Convention, WIPO Copyright Treaty, and WIPO Performance and Phonograms Treaty. We work is very similar to the way the UK and US systems work. We operate under two systems the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). We would like to increase the strength and interoperability of the GCC defense forces.
    Going forward we would harmonize IP rights and get a treaty signed to enforce standards that majority agrees on to make the certain that every person is kept safe form others. We will support the US and UK and all of our allies in what they propose.

  • Cameron
    Cameron November 16, 2017 Reply

    Legal Committee
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA
    Cameron Holtman

    The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea fully supports the idea of intellectual property rights laws. We are fine with those creating an idea and keeping that idea on their own without others trying to steal it. What our world shouldn’t have, however, are a set of rules created by those meaning to destroy ideologies and culture. The governments that are in power are those that have only gained power through the destruction of others. This we do not support. The countries that be, must be able to create their own laws and not deluded into yet another trap created by the most powerful to lessen their state. The weak must all stand together to become the most powerful. We must all take control of what we have and not have others dictate what we want. These are the truths of our society.
    The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each time ended, either in a revolutionary reconstitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes. In the earlier epochs of history, we find almost everywhere a complicated arrangement of society into various orders, a manifold gradation of social rank. In ancient Rome, we have patricians, knights, plebeians, slaves; in the Middle Ages, feudal lords, vassals, guild-masters, journeymen, apprentices, serfs; in almost all of these classes, again, subordinate gradations.
    The modern bourgeois society that has sprouted from the ruins of feudal society has not done
    away with class antagonisms. It has but established new classes, new conditions of oppression,
    new forms of struggle in place of the old ones.
    Our epoch, the epoch of the bourgeoisie, possesses, however, this distinct feature: it has
    simplified class antagonisms. Society as a whole is more and more splitting up into two great
    hostile camps, into two great classes directly facing each other – Bourgeoisie and Proletariat.
    From the serfs of the Middle Ages sprang the chartered burghers of the earliest towns. From these
    burgesses the first elements of the bourgeoisie were developed.
    The discovery of America, the rounding of the Cape, opened up fresh ground for the rising
    bourgeoisie. The East-Indian and Chinese markets, the colonization of America, trade with the
    colonies, the increase in the means of exchange and in commodities generally, gave to commerce,
    to navigation, to industry, an impulse never before is known, and thereby, to the revolutionary
    an element in the tottering feudal society, a rapid development.
    The feudal system of industry, in which industrial production was monopolized by closed guilds,
    now no longer sufficed for the growing wants of the new markets. The manufacturing system
    took its place. The guild-masters were pushed on one side by the manufacturing middle class;
    division of labor between the different corporate guilds vanished in the face of division of labor
    in every single workshop.
    Meantime the markets kept ever growing, the demand ever rising. The Even manufacturer no longer
    sufficed. Thereupon, steam and machinery revolutionized industrial production. The place of
    manufacture was taken by the giant, Modern Industry; the place of the industrial middle class by
    industrial millionaires, the leaders of the whole industrial armies, the modern bourgeois.
    Modern industry has established the world market, for which the discovery of America paved the
    way. This market has given an immense development to commerce, to navigation, to
    communication by land. This development has, in its turn, reacted on the extension of industry;
    and in proportion to industry, commerce, navigation, railways extended, in the same proportion
    the bourgeoisie developed, increased its capital, and pushed into the background every class
    handed down from the Middle Ages.
    We see, therefore, how the modern bourgeoisie is itself the product of a long course of
    development, of a series of revolutions in the modes of production and of exchange.
    Each step in the development of the bourgeoisie was accompanied by a corresponding political
    advance of that class. An oppressed class under the sway of the feudal nobility, an armed and
    self-governing association in the medieval commune
    here independent urban republic (as in Italy and Germany); there taxable “third estate” of the monarchy (as in France); afterwards, in the period of manufacturing proper, serving either the semi-feudal or the absolute monarchy as a counterpoise against the nobility, and, in fact, cornerstone of the great monarchies in general, the bourgeoisie has at last, since the establishment of Modern Industry and of the world market, conquered for itself, in the modern representative State, exclusive political sway. The executive of the modern state is but a committee for managing the common affairs of the whole
    bourgeoisie.
    The bourgeoisie, historically, has played a most revolutionary part. The bourgeoisie, wherever it has got the upper hand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his “natural superiors”, and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous “cash payment”. It has drowned the most heavenly ecstasies of religious fervor, of chivalrous enthusiasm, of philistine sentimentalism, in the icy water of egotistical calculation.
    Where ever money goes, death tends to follow. Using the guidelines above will allow our societies to all come together and agree upon a functioning rule for intellectual property rights laws. However, we cannot go astray due to the more fortunate, manipulating the poorer less fortunate countries to do their bidding.

    Snippets of The Communist Manifesto used.

  • Lifs
    Lifs November 16, 2017 Reply

    Legal
    International Intellectual Property Protection
    Laos
    Tristan Harman

    Intellectual Property (IP) is defined as “creations of the mind”, meaning it refers to anything theorized or invented. As economic stability is build upon a free market, and a free market upon goods and services constantly increasing in convenience and quality, it should be obvious that intellectual property is an essential part to maintaining an economy. The United Nations (UN) has made efforts to encourage the fair use of IP through the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and has been met with success in educating about and promoting restrictions on IP. However, moving forward, it is becoming increasingly clear that something more modern may be necessary to compete with evolving economies worldwide and the numerous fringe-cases omnipresent amongst issues. While stricter guidelines on IP would overall encourage more diverse and healthier economic environments, it is possible that said guidelines would allow monopolies to form and hinder competition, neither of which is healthy for an economy.

    With this in mind, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic would caution delegates towards moderation. Too little IP protection would allow copying of ideas and kill diversity, but too much would prevent similar products and kill competition. Laos has experienced economic difficulties in the past and sincerely hopes the same would not befall any other nations because of poorly-tuned policies. IP is an integral part of our growing economy, and we are of the firm opinion that harmonizing IP laws would be in everyone’s best interests. Moreover, we would like to state the immense importance of what we do today, and that all involved must take the utmost care when deciding these matters, taking into consideration how each decision will impact worldwide economic interests.

    Laos has been refining its IP laws since 1990 and will continue to do so in regards to the developing economic sectors. Like many other economically developing nations, Laos stands to lose much if IP protection is pushed to an extreme. Therefore, Laos would suggest attempting to find a middle ground in regards to IP policies, and forming an encompassing resolution to harmonize existing policies. We believe that this would not upset any delicate economies, while also allowing more compatibility between foreign IPs and an easier way to regulate finer amendments should they need to be made.

    In closing, Laos would like to stress that any shift in IP laws could have immense effects, and that the simplest and most effective solution would be to attempt to bring together existing IP policies. I hope that a resolution to this effect will be passed and that all interests will be respected in it, and that all may agree that moderation is necessary.

    Sources:
    “Lao People’s Democratic Republic: IP Laws and Treaties”, WIPO
    http://www.wipo.int/wipolex/en/profile.jsp?code=LA

    “International Intellectual Property Protection – GLICA”, GLICA
    http://www.modgear.net/glica17/hello-world-3/

  • Brekenhummel
    Brekenhummel November 16, 2017 Reply

    Country: Uruguay
    Committee: Legal
    Topic: International Intellectual Property Protection
    Delegate: Breken Hummel
    School: Grand Blanc High School

    The problem of international patent law has been ever increasing, as developed countries become more developed, and undeveloped countries are left behind. Many of these undeveloped countries have been accused of using other countries inventions without proper licensing.
    Uruguay affirms that the laws on international patents regarding medical advancements should be loosened slightly to allow for those countries with less to get the help they need without having to rely on donations. However, non-medical products should have strengthened to ensure that the worldwide entrepreneurs have incentive to continue to invent new products and help advance the world.
    Uruguay proposes that products deemed “medical products” by the United Nations be allowed for retail use in countries where it may not be marketed, but the producers of these products will still receive 20% of the total profit off the resale of these medical supplies to encourage them to at least be neutral toward the resale of their product. All other international patents should be strengthened to not allow the mass resale of product and any unlicensed use of brand name will be illegal, accompanied by harsher punishment to differ those looking to break these new international patent laws

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